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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 31, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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ong the river bank, attack the enemy on the river flank. So soon as these preliminary arrangements were completed, Major Stratton ordered Captain Skelly to charge the enemy's works with his command. This feature of the reconnoissance was one of the most creditable of any similar one since the inauguration of hostilities. It was, indeed, gallantly done. The carabineers at the same time charged the block-house from the river side, under the auspices of Colonel Spear. Lieutenant Roper, Adjutant Menzies, Captain Roberts, and several other officers were with the carabineers. The struggle here was intense in its character, being a terrific hand-to-hand conflict. Victory crowned our side. In this attack First Sergeant McFarlane, of company B, Eleventh Pennsylvania cavalry, fell while gallantly fighting, pierced through the heart by a hostile bayonet. Sergeant McFarlane was ever brave, ever dutiful, and ever ready to die for his country. His name must be added to the long list of the
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
your division at the time indicated and pursued them into the neighborhood of Baldwin, where the pursuit was abandoned. The following commanders of regiments and their officers-Colonel Enyart, First Kentucky; Colonel Sedgewick, Second Kentucky; Lieutenant-Colonel Hanson, Twentieth Kentucky, and Lieutenant-Colonel Osborn, Thirty-first Indiana--are entitled to credit for the prompt manner in which they have carried out the orders of the brigade commander. I also return my thanks to Dr. Menzies, brigade surgeon, and Capt. Frank W. Fee, brigade quartermaster, for the efficient manner in which they have discharged their duties; also Wickliffe Cooper, my assistant adjutant-general, for the very able and energetic manner in which he has performed the duties of his office, is entitled to high praise. I herewith transmit the reports of the several commanders of the regiments, to which I refer you especially for the meritorious conduct of those mentioned, not having had the honor t
Alex. H. Rice, Edward H. Rollins, Sedgwick, Sheffield, Shellabarger, Sherman, Sloan, Spaulding, Stevens, Benj. F. Thomas, Train, Van Horne, Verree, Wallace, Charles W. Walton, E. P. Walton, Wheeler, Albert S. White, and Windom--60. Nays--Messrs. Allen, Ancona, Joseph Baily, George H. Browne, Burnett, Calvert, Cox, Cravens, Crisfield, Crittenden, Diven, Dunlap, Dunn, English, Fouke, Grider, Haight, Hale, Harding, Holman, Horton, Jackson, Johnson, Law, May, McClernand, McPherson, Mallory, Menzies, Morris, Noble, Norton, Odell, Pendleton, Porter, Reid, Robinson, James S. Rollins, Sheil, Smith, John B. Steele, Stratton, Francis Thomas, Vallandigham, Voorhees, Wadsworth, Webster, and Wickliffe--48. The bill, thus amended, being returned to the Senate, Mr. Trumbull moved a concurrence in the house amendment, which prevailed by the following vote: Yeas--Messrs. Anthony, Bingham, Browning, Clark, Collamer, Dixon, Doolittle, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harris, King, Lane
, Riddle, Ashley, and Hutchins, of Ohio, Rollins, of N. H., and Van Horn, of N. Y. Mr. Stevens at length induced the Committee to rise and report the bill; when the measure was further opposed by Messrs. H. B. Wright, of Pa., Wadsworth, Harding, Menzies, and Wickliffe, of Ky., and supported by Messrs. Hickman, of Pa., Train, of Mass., Lovejoy, of Ill., Dunn, of Ind., Cox and Vallandigham, of Ohio; and passed under the Previous Question: Yeas 92; Nays 39. [Messrs. G. H. Browne, of R. I., Englisposed of all the Democrats and Border-State Unionists who voted, including Messrs. Calvert, Crisfield, Leary, Francis Thomas, and Webster, of Md., J. B. Blair, Wm. G. Brown, and Segar, of Va., Casey, Crittenden, Dunlap, Grider, Harding, Mallory, Menzies, Wadsworth, and Wickliffe, of Ky., Clements and Maynard, of Tenn., Hall, Noell, and J. S. Phelps, of Mo.--22 of the 50 from Border Slave States. The bill having reached the Senate, it was reported May 15. by Mr. Browning, of Illinois, subs
e, voluntarily left his chief to devote himself to their relief, and under his active, skilful, and humane auspices, and those of the medical directors with the divisions, they were comfortably removed to Chattanooga on the twenty-eighth. My sincere thanks are tendered to all the officers of the medical staff for their zealous and careful attentions to the wounded on this as well as on former fields. Especially are they due to Surgeon Ball, Medical Director of Geary's division, and to Surgeon Menzies, Medical Director of Cruft's division. On the twenty-ninth, Major-General Palmer returned to Chattanooga with his command, having in charge such prisoners as remained in Ringgold. On the thirtieth, the enemy, being reassured by the cessation of our pursuit, sent a flag of truce to our advanced lines at Catoosa, by Major Calhoun Benham, requesting permission to bury his dead and care for his wounded abandoned on the field of his last disaster at Ringgold. Copies of this corresponden
ne while working on the estate of Gusow, in the service of the Prussian minister, Count de Podervils. We are not informed as to its construction; it seems to have given satisfaction. He also invented a straw-chopper and many other machines. Menzies made a machine in Scotland in 1732, and Stirling of Dumblane another in 1758, but they do not seem to have been successes. Meikle, of Tyningham, East Lothian, Scotland, invented a machine in 1786, which is the type of modern thrashers. MenziMenzies's had a series of revolving flails, and Stirling's had a cylinder with arms upon a vertical shaft running at high velocity. Meikle invented the drum with beaters acting upon the grain in the sheaf, which was fed between rollers. The English improvement was to make the beating drum work in a concave known as the breasting, the grain and straw being scutched and rubbed between the two and carried to the shaker, which removed the straw from the grain and chaff, a large amount of grain also fa
ews will surprise many, yet it is true. Where does the blame lie? The Generals say it is not their fault; then who is to blame? While at Gauley Bridge, Surgeon Menzies took me to visit the hospitals at that place, and I must here confess that I never felt so much shocked in all my life for there were men in the last agonies, suffering from cold and exposure. They had no blankets when I arrived there, but Dr. Menzies rode back immediately to the Quartermaster and it was with great difficulty he could obtain one hundred single blankets to protect from the inclemency of the weather two hundred men. Then the floors, walls, beds, and clothing of the men ithat the surgeons are not at all to blame in this matter as they have no facilities whatever by which they can alleviate the condition of the sick and wounded. Dr. Menzies is, indeed, indefatigable in his labors to help and ameliorate the condition of the army, so is Dr. Muscroff, of the Tenth.--Nothing is left undone by these men
ow called Southern Rights, was the great cause of our troubles. Without disposing of the subject, the Senate went into Executive session, and old not adjourn till after five o'clock. House of Representatives--On motion of Mr. Stevens, the House went into Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union, (Mr. Blair, of Missouri, in the chair,) and took up House bill 224, making appropriations for the support of the military academy for the year ending the 30th of June, 1862. Mr. Menzies, of Kentucky, proceeded to reply to a speech delivered a few days ago by Mr. Stevens, of Pennsylvania. He said the disunionists of Kentucky were worse than the rebels of the revolted States, because they used their endeavors to turn the State over to the rebels. Mr. Wickliffe, of Kentucky, desired to know if the gentleman said that the Government had the right to enlist slaves in the army. Mr. Riddle replied that the gentleman might call them slaves, but he (Riddle) did not. Th