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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 31, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Menzies or search for Menzies in all documents.

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ong the river bank, attack the enemy on the river flank. So soon as these preliminary arrangements were completed, Major Stratton ordered Captain Skelly to charge the enemy's works with his command. This feature of the reconnoissance was one of the most creditable of any similar one since the inauguration of hostilities. It was, indeed, gallantly done. The carabineers at the same time charged the block-house from the river side, under the auspices of Colonel Spear. Lieutenant Roper, Adjutant Menzies, Captain Roberts, and several other officers were with the carabineers. The struggle here was intense in its character, being a terrific hand-to-hand conflict. Victory crowned our side. In this attack First Sergeant McFarlane, of company B, Eleventh Pennsylvania cavalry, fell while gallantly fighting, pierced through the heart by a hostile bayonet. Sergeant McFarlane was ever brave, ever dutiful, and ever ready to die for his country. His name must be added to the long list of the