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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.53 (search)
he Union forces. The immediate results of this expedition were the capture of 670 men, 1,000 stand of arms, 35 cannon, and 2 strong forts; the possession of the best sea entrance to the inland waters of Rear-Admiral Silas H. Stringham. From a photograph. North Carolina; and the stoppage of a favorite channel through which many supplies had been carried for the use of the Confederate forces. The vessels detailed were the Minnesota (flagship), Captain G. J. Van Brunt; Wabash, Captain Samuel Mercer; Susquehanna, Captain I. S. Chauncey; Pawnee, Commander S. C. Rowan; Monticello, Commander J. P. Gillis; Harriet Lane, Captain John Faunce; and the Cumberland (sailing-ship), Captain John Marston,--carrying in all 143 guns. For the transportation of troops there were the chartered steamers Adelaide, Commander H. S. Stellwagen, and George Peabody, Lieutenant R. B. Lowry, and the tug Fanny, Lieutenant Pierce Crosby. Upon these were embarked detachments of infantry from the 9th and 20
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 4: military operations in Western Virginia, and on the sea-coast (search)
s acted upon, and, at the time we are considering, a small squadron of vessels was in Hampton Roads for the purpose, on which were to be borne nine hundred land troops. Butler volunteered to command these troops. His offer was accepted, and on Monday, the 26th of August, 1861. at one o'clock P. M., the expedition departed, the squadron being under the command of Commodore Silas H. Stringham. The vessels composing the squadron were the Minnesota, Captain G. A. Van Brune; Wabash, Captain Samuel Mercer; Monticello, Commander John P. Gillis; Pawnee, Commander S. C. Rowan; Harriet Lane, Captain John Faunce; chartered steamer Adelaide, Commander H. S. Stellwagen; George Peabody, Lieutenant R. P. Lowry; and tug Fanny, Lieutenant Pierce Crosby. The Minnesota was the flag-ship. The transport, Service, was in charge of Commander Stellwagen, who had made the preparations. General Butler took passage in the flag-ship (the Minnesota), and his troops were on the transports George Peabody an
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 5: capture of the works at Hatteras Inlet by Flag officer Stringham.--destruction of the privateer Judah. (search)
hannel for entering the Sounds was Hatteras Inlet, and here the enemy had thrown up heavy earthworks to protect the most important smuggling route then in operation; for, although Charleston and Mobile were considered important ports for smuggling supplies to the South, Hatteras Inlet was none the less so. For the purpose of capturing the defences of Hatteras Inlet a squadron under command of Commodore Stringham was fitted out. It consisted of the Minnesota, Captain Van Brunt, Wabash, Captain Mercer, Monticello, Commander J. P. Gillis, Susquehanna, Captain Chauncey, Pawnee, Commander Rowan, Cumberland, Captain Marston, and the Revenue Steamer Harriet Lane, Captain Faunce. Three transports accompanied the squadron The Adelaide, Commander Stellwagen, George Peabody, Lieut.-Commanding Lowry, and the Fanny, Lieut.-Commanding Crosby. They carried about 900 troops under command of Major-General B. F. Butler. On the 27th of August, 1861, the day after leaving Hampton Roads, the squa
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
dock! Mr. Fox states that the Powhatan, Captain Mercer, sailed on the 6th of April; the Pawnee, Che policy indicated in the instructions to Captain Mercer and himself. No other naval vessels arrther mission. On the 7th, came orders for Captain Mercer to take command of the expedition to Charlhave to get ready very quickly, the Commander (Mercer) changed for Lieutenant Porter, and all the ords you, I remain, Abraham Lincoln. Captain Samuel Mercer, U. S. N. A true copy. M. C. Meigs, Cing position. He at last consented to take Capt. Mercer into the conference, give him the letter for himself, and be guided by his answer. Capt. Mercer considered it absolutely necessary for Foote tpril, going as far as Staten Island before Captain Mercer left her. The moment the ship had left ter as follows: Give the Powhatan up to Capt. Mercer. April 6, 1861. Seward. While the sing for the boat to return that had carried Capt. Mercer on shore, a swift little steamer came along[1 more...]
th Light Infantry, N. C. Vols. W. L. G. Andrews, Major Com'g Forts Hatteras and Clark. Com. Stringham's official report. United States flag-ship Minnesota, New York harbor, September 2, 1861. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of Navy: sir: I have the honor to inform the Department that I left Hampton Roads August 26, 1861, the earliest moment the weather would permit, with the flag-ship Minnesota, Captain G. A. Van Brune, having in company the United States steamers Wabash, Captain Samuel Mercer; Monticello, Commander John P. Gillis; Pawnee, Commander S. C. Rowan; Harriet Lane, Captain John Faunce; United States chartered steamers Adelaide, Commander Henry S. Stellwagen; George Peabody, Lieutenant R. B. Lowry; and tug Fanny, Lieutenant Pierce Crosby, all of the United States Navy. The transports Adelaide and George Peabody towing schooners with surf-boats on them, and the Monticello and Pawnee surf-boats only. Major-General Butler took passage in this ship; the transpo
, T. S. Bryan. Graves — A. R. Boone. Grayson — J. J. Cunningham. Hardin — H. E. Read, G. W. Maxson. Henry — B. W. Jenkins. Hopkins — L. M. Lowe, C. S. Greene. Jefferson — John Jones. Larue — J. S. Churchill. Logan — R. Browder, G. T. Edwards, W. M. Clark. City of Louisville — J. D. Pope, B. H. Hornsby, J. G. Gorsuch, W. Johnston, E. D. Ricketts, Blanton Duncan, Henry Gray, H. W. Bruce, R. McKee. Marshall — I. C. Gilbert. Marion — G. S. Miller. Meade — J. P. Walton, J. S. Taylor. Mercer — Philip B. Thompson. Muhlenburg — H. D. Lothrop, R. S. Russell. Nelson — J. D. Elliott, J. C. Wickliffe. Oldham--Mr. Miller, J. R. Gathright. Ohio--Dr. W. G. Mitchell, F. W. Forman. Scott — G. W. Johnson. Shelby--Colonel Jack Allen, J. F. Davis. Spencer — T. L. Burnett. Todd — James A. Russell, W. B. Harrison. Trigg — Mat. McKinney, H. C. Burnett. Washington — Pat. Symmes. Lyon — W. B. Machen, R. L. Cobb. McCracken — W. Bullitt. McLean--Rev.
e Government toward you, I remain, etc., Abraham Lincoln. Captain S. Mercer, United States Navy. A true copy. M. C. Meigs, Captain of Eng V. Fox, Washington, D. C. Navy Department, April 5, 1861. Captain Samuel Mercer, Commanding United States Steamer Powhatan, New-York: thom and due east of the lighthouse, where you will report to Captain Samuel Mercer, of the Powhatan, for special service. Should he not be thom and due east of the lighthouse, where you will report to Captain Samuel Mercer, of the Powhatan, for special service. Should he not be the morning of the eleventh instant, where you will report to Captain Samuel Mercer, of the Powhatan, for special service. Should he not be thst from and off Charleston lighthouse, where you will report to Captain Mercer, of the Powhatan, for duty, on the morning of the eleventh inst far as to transfer the crew to the North-Carolina, and to give Captain Mercer the leaves of absence for the officers. . . . . Andrew H. Foot
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), First expeditions of the Federal Navy (search)
ose members consisted of Captain Samuel F. Du Pont and Captain Charles H. Davis, of the navy; Alexander D. Bache, of the coast survey, and Major John G. Barnard, of the army. From their report, the Navy Department had organized and fitted out a squadron under the command of Flag-Officer Silas H. Stringham, which sailed under sealed orders on the 26th of August, 1861. It was composed of the Minnesota (flagship) under command of Captain G. J. Van Brunt; the Wabash, under command of Captain Samuel Mercer; the Monticello, the Susquehanna, the Pawnee, the Harriet Lane, and the Cumberland. In addition there were the chartered transport steamers Adelaide and George Peabody, and the ocean-going tug Fanny. These vessels had in tow a number of schooners and surf-boats to be used in landing a small body of troops, less than a thousand in number, that accompanied the expedition. The land force was under command of Major-General Benjamin F. Butler. It was soon known that the destination of
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: strategic Reconnoissances. (search)
ed the calibre of the former batteries. The two batteries on Jekyl Island were of greater strength. The outer one commanding the main channel had a bomb-proof constructed of palmetto logs, sand-bags, and railroad iron, well supported and braced within. Three casemated guns, carriages, and ammunition had been removed. The other battery, five hundred yards landward, consisted of two casemates, and arrangements for four barbette guns, magazine, and hot-shot furnace. On February 16th, General Mercer, in command at Brunswick, Ga., informed General R. E. Lee that all of the guns had been removed from St. Simon's and Jekyl Islands, and solicited instructions as follows: Before finally evacuating this position, I beg to bring to the consideration of the General the question of burning the town of Brunswick, for the moral effect it would produce upon the enemy.. . . No orders appear. The General may not have appreciated the moral effect of burning the property of their own people, w
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter VIII Hatteras InletRoanoke Island. (search)
steamer Adelaide, Commander Henry S. Stellwagen, and the Peabody, Lieutenant R. B. Lowry, took on board 500 of the 20th Regiment N. Y. Volunteers, Colonel Weber; 220 of the Ninth N. Y. Volunteers, Colonel Hawkins; 100 of the Union Coast Guard, Captain Nixon, and 60 of the 2d U. S. Artillery, Lieutenant Larned. With commendable alacrity they left the same day (26th of August) with the flag-ship of Stringham, the steam frigate Minnesota, Captain G. I. Van Brunt; steam frigate Wabash, Captain Samuel Mercer; Monticello, Commander John P. Gillis; Pawnee, Commander S. C. Rowan, and Revenue Cutter Harriet Lane, Captain John Faunce. The army tug Fanny, under the command of Lieutenant Peirce Crosby, of the navy, also accompanied the expedition. The transports towed two schooners, having large, unwieldy iron surf-boats on board. The same afternoon this force rounded Cape Hatteras and anchored off shore near the proposed point of debarkation, which was some three miles east of Hatteras
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