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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 10 (search)
Chattanooga to Ringgold. The intelligence received on each day was immediately transmitted to General Bragg. That officer suggested to me, on the 2d, that I was deceived, probably, by mere demonstrations, made for the purpose. On that day, Mercer's brigade, about fourteen hundred effective infantry, joined the army, from Savannah. It was to be replaced there by J. K. Jackson's, of the Army of Tennessee. The latter was retained, for the present, where it was most needed, for we were thre army, at and near Dalton, at that time. Canty's brigade (thirteen hundred and ninety-five effectives) is included improperly. It had just arrived at Rome, sent there from the vicinity of Mobile, by Major-General Maury. But, on the other hand, Mercer's was not; nor was Martin's division of cavalry, then near Cartersville, because its horses, worn down by continuous hard service since the beginning of the previous summer, were unfit for the field. It had seventeen hundred men fit for duty, ho
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 11 (search)
ering danger with equal cheerfulness; more confident and high-spirited even than when the Federal army presented itself before them at Dalton; and, though I say it, full of devotion to him who had commanded them, and belief of ultimate success in the campaign, were then inferior to none who ever served the Confederacy, or fought on this continent. At the commencement of this campaign, the army I commanded was that defeated under General Bragg at Missionary Ridge, with one brigade added, Mercer's, and two taken from it, Quarles's and Baldwin's. The Federal army opposed to us was Grant's army of Missionary Ridge, then estimated at eighty thousand men by the principal officers of the Army of Tennessee, increased by the Sixteenth and Twenty-third Corps, Hovey's division, A distinguished officer of the United States army, then on General Grant's staff, estimated the infantry and artillery at sixty-five thousand. and probably twelve or fifteen thousand recruits received during the prev
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Memorandum for Colonel Browne, Aide-de-camp. (search)
emy's rear between his army and Dalton. J. E. Johnston, General. Near Marietta, June 28, 1864. General S. Cooper, Richmond: I have received your dispatch inquiring why three regiments had not been sent to Savannah in exchange for those of Mercer's brigade. They have not been sent, because, before Mercer's brigade joined, we were engaged with an enemy more than double our numbers, and ever since have been in his immediate presence. I considered the fact that the Government CantMercer's brigade joined, we were engaged with an enemy more than double our numbers, and ever since have been in his immediate presence. I considered the fact that the Government Canty's troops. reinforced us from the coast afterward proof that my course was right. The three regiments shall be sent as soon as it can be done without danger to our position. They are now, like all this army, within rifle-shot of the enemy. J. E. Johnston. Near Marietta, June 29, 1864. General Braxton Bragg, Richmond: I recommend the assignment of Major-General Lovell to the command of Stewart's division. All quiet yesterday. (Signed) J. E. Johnston. Near Marietta, June 29, 18
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Memoranda of the operations of my corps, while under the command of General J. E. Johnston, in the Dalton and Atlanta, and North Carolina campaigns. (search)
's and Cleburne's divisions attacked by Blair's corps of the Army of the Cumberland; assault of enemy very resolute; at its close, three hundred Federal dead left in front of Cleburne's line, some lying against his works. Cleburne's loss two killed and nine wounded. Enemy in his front over eighteen hundred. On Cheatham's line enemy's loss still more severe. Cheatham's loss some two hundred and fifty. Fighting in front of Walker's, on right of Cleburne's, confined to skirmish-line held by Mercer's brigade, until many of the men bayoneted where they stood. Enemy's loss this day, in my front alone, could not have been less than five thousand. But the heaviest losses of the enemy were not in the assaults and partial engagements of the campaign, but in the daily skirmishing. This was kept up continuously for seventy days, during which the two armies never lost their grapple. It soon became customary, in taking up a new position, to extend the skirmish-lines until they were only l