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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 24, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for R. S. Mercer or search for R. S. Mercer in all documents.

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tling or even removal of the steam ferry boat Maryland, at Perryville, which was proposed to me by so many persons, and which, if consummated, would have prevented any necessity for the destruction of the bridges. The following letter from Col. R. S. Mercer, of Anne Arundel county, is evidence that I did refuse my assent to this proposition: Parkhurst, May 16, 1861. To His Excellency, Gov. Hicks-- Dear sir: I have just read your card in the American, denying the charge made by the Mayon the Pennsylvania troops. He drove back the troops. I heard you give the order to Egerton, and I heard him report to you. You disapproved of his act, and he pleaded misapprehension of your order. I remain, sir, respectfully, yours, &c., R. S. Mercer, Col. Third Regiment, M. C. I had not retired to my bed when the scuttling of the ferry boat was proposed to me. It was not proposed by men in whom I had no confidence. Highly respectable gentlemen urged it as the easiest and most lawful
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 99.-battle of Scarytown, Va. Fought July 17 (search)
y returning. They were not pursued by the rebels. All the dead and a few of the wounded were left oil the field, as they could not be gathered under the enemy's fire. Among the latter was Col. Norton, who is said to have behaved with great bravery. He sustained a severe, though not dangerous flesh wound, and is now in the rebel camp, where, we learn, he is doing well. About thirty of our wounded were brought in by their comrades. The wounds are generally slight. Lieut. Pomeroy and private Mercer, both of the Twenty-first, and private Haven of the Cleveland Artillery, are the only ones, I think, who cannot recover. An official list of the killed, wounded, and missing has been rendered, which places our loss at 57, as follows: killed, 9; wounded, 38; missing, 9. The loss of the enemy must have been fully equal to our own. The greatest misfortune of the day, however, was the loss of Col. Woodruff, Col. De Villiers, Lieut.-Col. Neff, and Captains Austin and Hurd. The Second Ke
ooner Savannah, a private armed vessel in the service, and sailing under a commission issued by authority of the Confederate States of America, had been captured by one of the vessels forming the blockading squadron off Charleston harbor, I directed a proposition to be made to the officer commanding that squadron, for an exchange of the officers and crew of the Savannah for prisoners of war held by this Government according to number and rank. To this proposition, made on the 19th ult., Captain Mercer, the officer in command of the blockading squadron, made answer on the same day that the prisoners (referred to) are not on board of any of the vessels under my command. It now appears by statements made without contradiction in newspapers published in New York, that the prisoners above mentioned were conveyed to that city, and have there been treated, not as prisoners of war, but as criminals; that they have been put in irons, confined in jail, brought before the Courts of Justice on