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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 8 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 6 4 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 26, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 4 0 Browse Search
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Merrill or search for Merrill in all documents.

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n placed in position before the disasters, and the only effort was to lull the enemy into security under the idea that no attack could be made with our communication so cut. The fear was, that it would be imposible to throw a bridge across the river for General Sherman's command, or that, if thrown, it could be maintained as long as it was needed. On Monday, November twenty-third, General Thomas moved to the front to reconnoitre, and occupied Indian Hill, with his left on Citico Creek. Captain Merrill and Lieutenant Wharton, of the Engineer corps, were instructed to attend to the building of bridges across that stream. On Monday night, at twelve M., the boats with the designated brigade left the North-Chickamauga and quietly effected a landing on the left bank of the Tennessee, both above and below the mouth of the South-Chickamauga, and the business of ferrying over troops then began. The rise in the river had increased its width so that we had not been able to accumulate boats su
ldom relieved, and are sometimes obliged to walk twenty-three miles to their post of duty. The rebels are represented as being engaged in replanking the road from Chancellorsville to Orange Court-House, and are laying out several new roads through the wilderness. Twelve or fifteen prisoners were captured by General Kilpatrick, and he returned to his camp yesterday evening, without having lost a man during his reconnoissance. At cavalry headquarters last night, no special details of General Merrill's operations had been received, except that he had been to Madison Court-House, and that he was, at the time his courier was despatched on Saturday night, at Barnett's Ford. He had encountered no considerable force of the enemy, and had met with no losses. The First corps, General Newton, left its camp on the night of Friday, fifth instant, and proceeded to the vicinity of Raccoon Ford. The corps, which was afterward followed by two divisions of the Third, encamped two miles from t