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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6., The Lawrence Light Guard.—Continued. (search)
ortherly part of the yard, and lived in part of it himself, renting the remainder. Another house was removed from the lot just south of the town house to the rear of the Hall house, and let for tenements. The old lime storehouse was occupied by the Odd Fellows in the upper part, and the second story contained Henry Mitchell's barber shop. Mr. Gregg occupied the lower floor for his grocery and grain business. Another large building was used as a livery stable on the lower floor, and Moses Merrill and Edward Copp, house and carriage painters, had a shop above. To enable Mr. Gregg to reach his store from Main street, a bridge was built over the old runway to the river. It was in Gregg's stable that the great fire of 1850 began. When Mr. Gregg took possession of the northern half of James' yard, Mr. Benjamin Moore moved his blacksmith shop from the other side of the street to the southerly part of the yard, and his family moved from Union street to the Joseph James house. Mr
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6., The Baptist Church of Medford. (search)
and were also destroyed. The Misses Tufts' dwelling and Richard Tufts' wheelwright shop on the same side were also laid in ashes. On the opposite side of Main street the fire commenced at the bridge with the dwelling of Nathan W. Wait, and swept down Daniel Lawrence's store and dwelling house Jas. Hyde's dwelling and store, Elias Tufts' wheelwright shop and dwelling, George E. Willis' tinware shop and dwelling, Mitchell's barber shop and dwelling, Benj. Parker's dwelling and stable, Moses Merrill and Son's paint shop, and Hartshorn's harness shop (all in one building). A ten-footer, occupied by an Irish family and three stables, were all totally destroyed. The conflagration swept on before a strong northwest wind until about twelve o'clock, when it came to the lumber yard of Oakman Joyce, two-thirds of which was destroyed, when its progress was checked. The old Nathan Wait house, nearly opposite the hotel, came near being destroyed, but fortunately, the flames in this directi