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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for T. C. Merrill or search for T. C. Merrill in all documents.

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road trains at Warrenton Junction until General Porter's corps had marched from that place, and then to run back the trains as far as practicable, and, covering them with his troops, to repair the bridges as fast as possible. I also directed Capt. Merrill, of the engineers, with a considerable force, to repair the railroad track and bridges as far as possible in the direction of Bristow station. The road was accordingly put in order from Warrenton Junction to Kettle Run, during the twenty-sevcolumn was pushed just outside of town, on the road to Sulphur Springs, ready to move forward to that point should it be necessary. I am pushing a reconnoissance toward Waterloo Bridge, to see what is there. Communicate fully to me through Captain Merrill, who will hand you this note, the condition of things in front of you. Our work must be finished here to-day. We have no time to spare. Provisions will be in Warrenton this morning. (Signed) John Pope, Major-General. A true copy: T. C.
road trains at Warrenton Junction until General Porter's corps had marched from that place, and then to run back the trains as far as practicable, and, covering them with his troops, to repair the bridges as fast as possible. I also directed Capt. Merrill, of the engineers, with a considerable force, to repair the railroad track and bridges as far as possible in the direction of Bristow station. The road was accordingly put in order from Warrenton Junction to Kettle Run, during the twenty-sevcolumn was pushed just outside of town, on the road to Sulphur Springs, ready to move forward to that point should it be necessary. I am pushing a reconnoissance toward Waterloo Bridge, to see what is there. Communicate fully to me through Captain Merrill, who will hand you this note, the condition of things in front of you. Our work must be finished here to-day. We have no time to spare. Provisions will be in Warrenton this morning. (Signed) John Pope, Major-General. A true copy: T. C.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 153.-the fight near Memphis, Mo. (search)
Doc. 153.-the fight near Memphis, Mo. Missouri Democrat account. on the eighteenth of July, Major John Y. Clopper, in command of a detachment of Merrill's Horse, about three hundred strong, and a detachment of Major Rogers's battalion, Eleventh Missouri State militia, about one hundred strong, attacked and, after a very severe fight, entirely routed Porter and Dunn's combined bands of guerrillas, six hundred strong. At last accounts Major Clopper was still in swift march upon the forceund. The severity of the fight is well illustrated by the fact that five successive charges across the open ground, on the concealed enemy, were repulsed, and the sixth was successful, resulting in a hand-to-hand struggle, in which one man of Merrill's Horse was killed by a blow with a stock of a musket across the back of the neck, breaking his neck. At the time the messenger left the ground all of our killed, wounded, and missing had been found, amounting to eighty-three, and twenty-thre
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), The fight in Bollinger County, Mo. (search)
The fight in Bollinger County, Mo. Major Lazar's despatch. Greenville, July 30, 1862. Colonel T. C. Merrill: sir: Yesterday, at eleven o'clock A. M., Captain Whybank, with one hundred and twenty men of companies A and F, Thirteenth regiment, attacked Major Tenley and Captain Polson and one hundred and eighty men, near Bollinger's Mill, Bollinger County, killing ten, wounding a large number, and capturing a lot of horses, guns, etc. The brush was so thick, it was impossible to find all the wounded. The rebels were well mounted and well equipped. We did not lose a man. Full particulars by mail. B. T. Lazar, Major Commanding Post.
t eight o'clock, determined to find the enemy, which, from the best information he could get, was from seven to nine hundred strong, and had moved down Auxvasse Creek. The Colonel scattered his command, with instructions that whenever the enemy's position was discovered, to send him word immediately, while he would move out to the State road, leading from Columbia to Danville. Before the Colonel arrived at the road, he discovered that there were troops in it, which proved to be parts of Merrill's Horse and the Third Iowa cavalry, and a part of Col. Glover's regiment — in all about five hundred and fifty men. Colonel Guitar gave them the same instructions that he had given the others in the morning, and sent about two hundred of them across the creek, to follow down parallel with it, and as close to it as possible. The Colonel, when he got to the timber on the south side of the creek, left the State road and proceeded down the creek until he reached the intersection of the road
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 179.-the fight at Compton's Ferry, Mo. (search)
's Ferry, Mo. Cincinnati Gazette account. headquarters First battalion Merrill's horse, camp defiance, Glasgow, Mo., August 19. this post, garrisoned by about one hundred effective men of Merrill's Horse, had been threatened for ten days by a guerrilla band, numbering from seven to eight hundred men, commanded by the as fears were entertained for our safety. To this force was added company A, Merrill's Horse, twenty-four men, Lieut. Lovejoy; company B, Merrill's Horse, forty meMerrill's Horse, forty men, Lieut. Bennett; company D, Merrill's Horse, fifty men, Lieut. Roher, under the command of Major C. B. Hunt, and on morning of the eighth we started to look for thMerrill's Horse, fifty men, Lieut. Roher, under the command of Major C. B. Hunt, and on morning of the eighth we started to look for the enemy, who was supposed to be encamped near Silver Creek, some thirty miles distant. We marched thirty miles, learned that Poindexter occupied a strong camp in theed, and even capped and cocked. The pursuit was continued by Major Hunt, with Merrill's Horse, Capt. Turley's company, and company D, Ninth Missouri State militia,