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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 182 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 74 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 62 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 60 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 31 1 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 30 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 24 0 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 20 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for Merrimac or search for Merrimac in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Union and Confederate navies. (search)
, at New York. These twelve vessels, together with the Anacostia, a small screw-tender, at the Washington Navy Yard, were all that could be said to be at the immediate disposal of the Administration. When the vessels abroad were gathered in, and those in ordinary were fitted out, the Government had a little squadron of about 30 steamers, of which the most important were 5 screw-frigates (the sixth, the Merrimac, having been abandoned at Norfolk), 6 sloops of The United States frigate Merrimac before and after conversion into an iron-clad. the first or Hartford class, 4 large side-wheelers, and 8 sloops of the second or Iroquois class. All these were exceedingly valuable as the nucleus of a fleet, but for the war which the Government had now on hand they could be considered as nothing more than this. According to the position which the Administration was very soon compelled to take, the struggle was one à outrance. In a foreign war the conflict usually springs from a collision
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first fight of iron-clads. (search)
unded so that the pivot-guns could be The burning of the frigate Merrimac and of the Gosport Navy-Yard. (see foot-note, P. 712.) Remodeling the Merrimac at the Gosport Navy Yard. [For a statement of the details of the vessel differing from them as shown in this picture, seeng iron plates was the Tredegar foundry. Its resources were The Merrimac, from a sketch made the day before the fight. a prow of Steel. osiah Tattnall, Commodore, C. S. N. Commanders of the Virginia (or Merrimac ). from a photograph. We reserved our fire until within easy I had charge. As we Colonel John Taylor Wood, lieutenant on the Merrimac. from an oil portrait. swung, the Congress came in range, nearly els. Two of the officers of the Raleigh, Lieutenant Tayloe The Merrimac ramming the Cumberland. and Midshipman Hutter, were killed whileder, Morris replied, Never! I'll sink alongside!--editors. The Merrimac driving the Congress from her anchorage. so far as we could discov
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.58 (search)
Watching the Merrimac. R. E. Colston, Brigadier-General, C. S. A. In March, 1862, I was in command of a Confederate brigade and of a district on the south side of the James River, embracing all the river forts and batteries down to the mouth of Nansemond River. My pickets were posted all along the shore opposite Newport News. From my headquarters at Smithfield I was in constant and rapid communication through relays of couriers and signal stations with my department commander, Major-G The commander of the Congress recognized at once the impossibility of resisting the assault of the ram which had just sunk the Cumberland. With commendable promptness and presence of mind, he slipped his cables, and ran her aground upon The Merrimac passing the Confederate Battery on Craney Island, on her way to attack the Federal fleet. the shallows, where the Merrimac, at that time drawing twenty-three feet of water, was unable to approach her, and could attack her with artillery alone.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.60 (search)
The plan and construction of the Merrimac. I. John M. Brooke, Commander, C. S. N. Early in June, 1861, the Secretary of the Navy of the Confederate States asked me to design an iron-clad. The first idea presenting itself was a shield of timber, two feet thick, plated with three or more inches of iron, inclined to the horizontal plane at the least angle that would permit working the guns; this shield, its eaves submerged to the depth of two feet, to be supported by a hull of equal leeck ends were two feet below water and not awash, and the ship was as strong and well protected at her center-line as anywhere else, as her knuckle was two feet below her water-line, and her plating ran down to the knuckle and Cross-section of Merrimac, from a drawing by John L. Porter, Constructor. a-4 inches of iron. B--22 inches of wood. was there clamped. Her draught of water was 21 feet forward and 22 feet aft. After the engagements of the 8th and 9th of March, 1862, I put her in t