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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 182 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 74 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 62 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 60 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 31 1 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 30 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 24 0 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 20 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for Merrimac or search for Merrimac in all documents.

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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First iron-clad Monitor. (search)
hat test may now be stated. The steamship Merrimac, a naval vessel, which the rebels scuttled and been originally designed, of destroying the Merrimac in the dry-dock; but made us not less anxiousal Wool, at Fortress Monroe, stating that the Merrimac had come down from Norfolk the preceding day,at the Fortress itself was in danger, for the Merrimac was impenetrable, and could take what positioCommander Dahlgren and Colonel Meigs. The Merrimac, said Stanton, who was vehement, and did mosared for the emergency; an assurance that the Merrimac, with her draught, and loaded with iron, coulnk in the channel until it was known that the Merrimac had entered the river, or was on its way hithvice. He was informed that the egress of the Merrimac must be prevented, and the vessel destroyed wanderbilt responded that he could destroy the Merrimac, and was ready to do so, but he wanted the Mo destruction of the Vanderbilt instead of the Merrimac. In that event a good sale would be made of [19 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Torpedo service in Charleston harbor. (search)
tery at the earliest moment practicable. This being accomplished before the attack on Fort Sumter opened, early in April I placed the floating battery in position at the western extremity of Sullivan's Island to enfilade certain barbette guns of the fort which could not be reached effectively by our land batteries. It, therefore, played an important part in that brief drama of thirty-three hours, receiving many shots without any serious injury. About one year later, in Hampton roads, the Merrimac, plated and roofed with two layers of railroad iron, met the Monitor in a momentous encounter, which first attracted the attention of the civilized world to the important change that iron-plating or armors would thenceforth create in naval architecture and armaments. The one and a half to two inch plating used on Captain Hamilton's floating battery has already grown to about twelve inches thickness of steel plates of the best quality, put together with the utmost care, in the effort to res