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Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 16 0 Browse Search
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s. General Torbert being absent on leave at this time, I did not recall him, but appointed General Merritt Chief of Cavalry, for Torbert had disappointed me on two important occasions — in the Lurayby the fact that Early had left word in Staunton that he would fight at Waynesboroa, I directed Merritt to move toward that place with Custer, to be closely followed by Devin, who was to detach one b place as far as Amherst Court House, which is sixteen miles short of the town, so Devin, under Merritt's supervision, marched along the James River, destroying the canal, while Custer pushed ahead oad attached themselves to the column: they literally lifted the wagons out of the mud. From Columbia Merritt, with Devin's division, marched to Louisa Court House and destroyed the Virginia Central touster across the South Anna, by way of Ground Squirrel bridge, to Ashland, where it united with Merritt, who had meanwhile marched through Hanover Junction. Our appearance at Ashland drew the Confed
n choice, my position as a department commander by joining the armies at Petersburg. Taking the road across the Peninsula, I started from the White House with Merritt's column on the 25th of March, and encamped that night at Harrison's Landing. Very early next morning, in conformity with a request from General Grant, I left by boat for City Point, Merritt meanwhile conducting the column across the James River to the point of rendezvous. The trip to City Point did not take long, and on arrival at army headquarters the first person I met was GeneralJohn A. Rawlins, General Grant's chief-of-staff. Rawlins was a man of strong likes and dislikes, and posithe brigades; the Third Division under Custer, Colonels Wells, Capehart, and Pennington being the brigade commanders. These two divisions united were commanded by Merritt, as they had been since leaving Winchester. Crook headed the Second Division, his brigades being under General Davies and Colonels John I. Gregg and Smith. th