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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 41 1 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 22 4 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 12 0 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 9 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 3 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 8 0 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 25, 1864., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 24, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir. You can also browse the collection for Merritt or search for Merritt in all documents.

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cognized rules of political courtesy, Conkling should have been consulted; and Merritt, the friend and appointee of Sherman, was ousted to make room for Robertson. I was removed from London in favor of Merritt; General Grant's brother-in-law, Mr. Cramer, the Charge d'affaires at Denmark, was displaced for me, and Mr. Nicholas Fte, was removed from the position of Charge at Berne to make room for Cramer. Merritt, Cramer, and I were each placed where we had no desire to be, and Fish lost hitch as my endorsement of you for either place. At the Executive Mansion I met Merritt, who had come on from New York to save himself from taking my place, and as wehis he did, but offered me no other appointment, and he did not recall that of Merritt, so that if Merritt should be confirmed I would be out of office altogether. Merritt should be confirmed I would be out of office altogether. I remained a few weeks in Washington, consulting not only with Senators Conkling and Logan, but constantly with Vice-President Arthur, and once returning to New York