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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 41 1 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 22 4 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 12 0 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 9 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 3 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 8 0 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 25, 1864., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 24, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Merritt or search for Merritt in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.70 (search)
hem as long as he had a cartridge in his box, but I thought possibly he might lack discretion. I rode a short distance in my front and met one of Lazenby's men (I had forgotten his name, but that gallant old comrade, Ned Ewart, came to my rescue a day or two since, and in conversation with him I was informed that this man was Ned Farmer), mounted upon a splendid horse and marching a prisoner beside him. Ned said he had captured him on the lines. The prisoner stated that he belonged to General Merritt's Cavalry Division. I sent Farmer with his horse and prisoner to Colonel Mayo. Farmer telling me that Lazenby was all right, I felt assured. Soon after that I heard firing along Lazenby's line; he was evidently engaged. I called the regiment at once to arms, and awaited developments. The firing on Lazenby's line soon ceased, but I had no report from him. Soon Lieutenant Clarence Haden, of Company B, came in and reported that Lazenby and his whole command had been captured by the e