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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Merrritt or search for Merrritt in all documents.

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Kansas troops. Up to this time Gen. Lyon had received two wounds, and had his fine dappled gray shot dead under him, which is sufficient evidence that he had sought no place of safety for himself while he placed his men in danger. Indeed, he had already unwisely exposed himself. Seeing blood upon his hat, I inquired, General, are you badly hurt? to which he replied, I think not seriously. He had mounted another horse and was as busily engaged as ever. The Iowa First, under Lieutenant-Colonel Merrritt, and part of the Kansas troops were now ordered forward to take the place of the Missouris. The former had all along the march been gay and happy, passing the time with songs which were frequently joined in by the entire regiment, making together a chorus which could be heard for miles, and Gen. Lyon had often remarked that they had too much levity to do good fighting. Mutual friends suggested that they ought at least to have an opportunity to show themselves in case of an engag
Kansas troops. Up to this time Gen. Lyon had received two wounds, and had his fine dappled gray shot dead under him, which is sufficient evidence that he had sought no place of safety for himself while he placed his men in danger. Indeed, he had already unwisely exposed himself. Seeing blood upon his hat, I inquired, General, are you badly hurt? to which he replied, I think not seriously. He had mounted another horse and was as busily engaged as ever. The Iowa First, under Lieutenant-Colonel Merrritt, and part of the Kansas troops were now ordered forward to take the place of the Missouris. The former had all along the march been gay and happy, passing the time with songs which were frequently joined in by the entire regiment, making together a chorus which could be heard for miles, and Gen. Lyon had often remarked that they had too much levity to do good fighting. Mutual friends suggested that they ought at least to have an opportunity to show themselves in case of an engag