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John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 5 1 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 5 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 5 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 1 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Shiloh reviewed. (search)
of which a fac-simile accompanies this article [page 496]. I never imagined that in the future it would have the interest which now attaches to it, and after the battle it was laid aside and forgotten. Within two years after that meeting, quite contrary opinions developed themselves between General Sherman and myself concerning the battle of Shiloh, and his Memoirs give a different account of the interview above described. He says that he handed the map to my engineer-officer, Captain Michler, who, in fact, was not present, and complains that it was never returned to him. He says that I grumbled about the stragglers, and that he feared I would not bring my army across the river. One would suppose that his fears would have been allayed by the fact that, at that very moment, my troops were arriving and covering his front as fast as legs and steamboats could carry them. In the execution of the retreat described in the reports of McClernand and Sherman, from the west to the eas
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Exchange of prisoners. (search)
into the absurd position that General Order No. 207, which recognized neither paroles or a return into captivity, should be deemed to be in force before it had any existence. As an illustration in this connection of what strange things are done in time of war, I refer to a Court of Inquiry, the official proceedings of which are found in the Army and Navy official Gazette, under date of July 14th, 1863. The court was convened on June 30th, 1863, to determine whether Major Duane and Captain Michler, who had been captured and paroled on the 28th of June, 1863, by General Stuart, should be placed on duty without exchange, or be returned to the enemy as prisoners of war. The general order then in force, in its 131st paragraph, declared that if the government does not approve of the parole, the paroled officer must return into captivity. Yet the court found that the government was free to place those officers on duty without having been exchanged, and gave as its reason that I had b
med mainly with revolvers, burst from the wooded cover and leaped over the line of low sand-hills behind which they had lain, and made a desperate rush upon McRae's battery confronting them. Volley after volley of grape and canister was poured through their ranks, cutting them down by scores, but not for an instant checking their advance. They were 1,000 when they started; a few minutes later, they were but 900; but the battery was taken; while McRae, choosing death rather than flight, Lieut. Michler, and most of their men, lay dead beside their guns. Our supporting infantry, twice or thrice the Texans in number, and including more than man for man of regulars, shamefully withstood every entreaty to charge. They lay groveling in the sand in the rear of the battery, until the Texans came so near as to make their revolvers dangerous, when the whole herd ran madly down to and across the river, save those who were overtaken by a cowardly death on the way. The Colorado volunteers vied w
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 9: battle of Shiloh. March and April, 1862. (search)
ng his troops across at the time he was speaking to me. About half an hour afterward General Buell himself rode up to where I was, accompanied by Colonels Fry, Michler, and others of his staff. I was dismounted at the time, and General Buell made of me a good many significant inquiries about matters and things generally. By thot, of course, understand the shape of the ground, and asked me for the use of my map, which I lent him on the promise that he would return it. He handed it to Major Michler to have it copied, and the original returned to me, which Michler did two or three days after the battle. Buell did cross over that night, and the next day weMichler did two or three days after the battle. Buell did cross over that night, and the next day we assumed the offensive and swept the field, thus gaining the battle decisively. Nevertheless, the controversy was started and kept up, mostly to the personal prejudice of General Grant, who as usual maintained an imperturbable silence. After the battle, a constant stream of civilian surgeons, and sanitary commission agents, men
n Kirby, Sixth United States infantry, A. D.C., who was wounded on the thirty-first; R. S. Thorn, Esq., a member of the Cincinnati cavalry, who acted as volunteer Aid-de-Camp, behaved with distinguished gallantry; Colonel Barnett, Chief of Artillery and Ordnance; Capt. G. H. Gilman, Nineteenth United States infantry, and Inspector of Artillery; Capt. James Curtis, Fifteenth United States infantry, Assistant Inspector-General; Captain Wiles, Twenty-second Indiana, Provost-Marshal General; Capt. Michler, Topographical Engineers; Captain Jesse Merrill, of the signal corps, whose corps behaved well Captain Elmer Otis, Fourth regular cavalry, who commanded the second courier line, connected the various headquarters most successfully, and who made a most opportune and brilliant charge on Wheeler's cavalry, routing the brigade and recapturing three hundred of our prisoners. Lieut. Edson, United States ordnance officer, who, during the battle of Wednesday, distributed ammunition under fire
nder to critically examine his front, and ascertain the practicability of an assault. The twenty-ninth was spent in the reconnoissance and the movement of General Warren. About six P. M. Brigadier-General Wright, commanding division in the Sixth corps, reported to me he had discovered a point, on our extreme right, where the obstacles to be overcome were much less than in our immediate front, and where an assault, he thought, was practicable with inconsiderable loss. At the same time Captain Michler, engineer, reported that an assault in front of the Third corps, though hazardous, was not impracticable. I also learned from Major Ludlow, A. D. C., just returned from General Warren's column, that General Warren had moved up the plank-road, driving in the enemy's skirmishers, till he developed their line of battle, and had taken a position which outflanked the enemy, and from which there was no difficulty of assaulting and turning the enemy's flank. These favorable reports caused me
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--full report of General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
from my march to join General Lee, without the probability of compensating results. I, therefore, determined, after getting the wagons under way, to proceed directly north so as to cut the Baltimore and Ohio railroad (now becoming the enemy's main war artery) that night. I found myself encumbered by about four hundred prisoners, many of whom were officers. I paroled nearly all at Brookeville that night, and the remainder next day at Cookesville. Among the number were Major Duane and Captain Michler, Engineers, United States army. At Cookesville our advance encountered and put to flight a small party of the enemy, and among the prisoners taken there were some who said they belonged to the Seven hundred loyal Eastern shoremen. Brigadier-General Fitz. Lee reached the railroad soon after daylight, the march having continued all night. The bridge was burnt at Sykesville, and the track torn up at Hood's mill, where the main body crossed it. Measures were taken to intercept trains,.
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 3: (search)
ng his troops across at the time he was speaking to me. About half an hour afterward General Buell himself rode up to where I was, accompanied by Colonels Fry, Michler, and others of his staff. I was dismounted at the time, and General Buell made of me a good many significant inquiries about matters and things generally. By thot, of course, understand the shape of the ground, and asked me for the use of my map, which I lent him on the promise that he would return it. He handed it to Major Michler to have it copied, and the original returned to me, which Michler did two or three days after the battle. Buell did cross over that night, and the next day weMichler did two or three days after the battle. Buell did cross over that night, and the next day we assumed the offensive and swept the field, thus gaining the battle decisively. Nevertheless, the controversy was started and kept up, mostly to the personal prejudice of General Grant, who, as usual, maintained an imperturbable silence. After the battle, a constant stream of civilian surgeons, and sanitary commission agents, m
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Panama Canal. (search)
844 Survey for Panama Railroad by Col. G. W. Hughes, U. S. A.1849 Panama Railroad begunJan., 1850 Exploration of Capt. Fitzroy, R. N.1850 Exploration of Dr. Cullen1850 Ship-canal proposed by the Bulwer-Clayton treatyApril 19, 1850 Exploration of J. C. Trautwine1852 Exploration of Capt. Prevost, R. N.1853 Exploration of Lionel Gisborne1854 Exploration of Lieut. Strain, U. S. N.1854 Exploration of Captain Kennish1855 First train from ocean to oceanJan. 28, 1855 Exploration of Lieutenant Michler, U. S. A.1858 Exploration of Frederick N. Kelley1864 Exploration of M. de la Charne1865 De Paydt announces discovery of a favorable route1865 Exploration of Gonzorga1866 Treaty signed by the United States and ColombiaJan. 26, 1870 Exploration of Corn. T. O. Selfridge, U. S. N.1870 Exploration of Com. Tull, U. S. N.1875 General Turr and a committee propose a canalOct., 1876 Lieut. L. A. B. Wyse's survey (1875) PublishedAutumn, 1877 Explorations of Reclus and Sosa1878 Interna
s from its starting point a halt was ordered, and the prospects indicated trouble ahead; which was indeed the case, for the enemy was found strongly posted on the south bank of Tolopotomoy Creek, an affluent of the Pamunkey. It was high noon when an order came sending us to the front; and moving by a road newly cut through the trees, marked by rough guide was place boards directing to the different divisions, we finally emerged in a cornfield on what was known as Jones' Farm. W. Jones.—Michler's Army Map. The rattle of musketry and occasional boom of cannon farther to the right showed that the deadly business had begurn in earnest, and the whizzilng of stray bullets warned us of our nearness to the picket line. A singular incident happened this day on the line of the First Division. This line ran through the yard of the Sheldon House, and behind it were several guns in position exchanging shots with the enemy's batteries. In the house were several ladies who had refused to l
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