Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Dixon H. Miles or search for Dixon H. Miles in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 3 document sections:

ered, after three days fighting. About the commencement of the month, Col. Dixon H. Miles, of Bull Run memory, who succeeded General Sigel (Gen. Saxton's successooss. From that time, it was known that the enemy had entered Maryland, and Colonel Miles began to strengthen his position at every point. His force consisted of th endeavoring to rally his wavering companions, as to attract the attention of Col. Miles. Lieut.-Col. Downy, of the Third Maryland home brigade, was also complimentedad. Gen. White commanded the heights, Major McIlvaine all the artillery, and Gen. Miles held command over all the forces Col. Baring, acting Brigadier-General, whose Gen. Hill immediately took up his headquarters in the tavern-stand, next to Col. Miles's. Old Stonewall, after riding down to the river, returned to Bolivar Heightslag was sent proposing an unconditional surrender, when the firing ceased. General Miles, the Federal commander, is reported to be wounded. The results of the su
o'clock, surrendered, after three days fighting. About the commencement of the month, Col. Dixon H. Miles, of Bull Run memory, who succeeded General Sigel (Gen. Saxton's successor) to the commande force with no loss. From that time, it was known that the enemy had entered Maryland, and Colonel Miles began to strengthen his position at every point. His force consisted of the Twelfth New-Yorch coolness while endeavoring to rally his wavering companions, as to attract the attention of Col. Miles. Lieut.-Col. Downy, of the Third Maryland home brigade, was also complimented by the Colonel fhe Charlestown road. Gen. White commanded the heights, Major McIlvaine all the artillery, and Gen. Miles held command over all the forces Col. Baring, acting Brigadier-General, whose forces consisted not to be found. Gen. Hill immediately took up his headquarters in the tavern-stand, next to Col. Miles's. Old Stonewall, after riding down to the river, returned to Bolivar Heights, the observed of
loaded, and nine hundred negroes. This important conquest was effected without the loss of a man on our side. So much is official. It is reported that the cavalry, one thousand in number, escaped by Shepherdstown. Another account, received late last night, says that the surrender took place on Monday morning last, at ten o'clock. The firing commenced as early as five o'clock in the morning. Shortly after the Yankees sent out a flag of truce, proposing a conditional surrender; but our firing did not cease, when another flag was sent proposing an unconditional surrender, when the firing ceased. General Miles, the Federal commander, is reported to be wounded. The results of the surrender, according to this last account, are as follows: Twelve thousand Yankees, thirteen thousand Enfield rifles, fifty cannon, one hundred four-horse teams, a number of fine artillery horses, a large quantity of ammunition, some quartermaster and commissary stores, and one thousand contrabands.