hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 6, 1862., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. B. Miles or search for J. B. Miles in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 3 document sections:

division, effecting his movements without the knowledge of the enemy, and deployed the Irish brigade to the right and Colonel Miles's brigade to the left of the plankroad. Captain Schwartz, with his three hundred cavalry, was also formed on the samement. The whole column then pressed on, and soon caught up with the retreating rebels, whom they drove three miles. Colonel Miles's brigade reaped new honors on this occasion, and deserve honorable mention for the cheerfulness with which they endu brigade to relieve General Gregg, but its services were not required when it arrived there. During all this time, Colonel Miles's brigade remained on the extreme left, closing around the railroad to the enemy's right, being two miles from our ma, which took position on the right of the corps in front. General Warren, in order to take his position in rear of Colonel Miles, was obliged to use troops from the rear of the column to support him. The constant changes of the enemy on our front
ing upon the adoption of the resolutions, the Rev. J. A. Butler was called out and advocated their adoption in a speech of an hour's duration, replete with patriotic sentiments, humor, sarcasm, and sound and convincing logic. After which the resolutions were adopted unanimously. On motion of Mr. Morse, Mr. Butler was requested to furnish a copy of his speech for publication, which he kindly consented to do. Upon the nomination of Colonel Moore, Rev. J. A. Butler, J. M. Hanks, Esq., J. B. Miles, and Hon. Josiah McKiel were elected delegates to the Convention to be held at Little Rock on the eighth instant, with power to fill vacancies. Upon its being suggested that Judge McKiel was in feeble health, and might not be able to attend the Convention, the Chair remarked that he should place a steamboat at the service of the delegates, as he considered the object of the mission of sufficient importance to warrant him in so doing. A motion was then made and carried that the proce
Doc. 94.-rebel partisan Rangers. In the rebel House of Representatives, on the fifteenth of February, Mr. Miles, from the Committe on Military Affairs, reported a bill to repeal an act to organize partisan rangers, approved April twenty-first, 1862, and for other purposes. The bill being taken up, Mr. Miles advocated its passage. He said the Senate bill, in relation to cavalry, contained a provision to abolish corps of partisan rangers; but the Committee had deemed it too sweeping in Mr. Miles advocated its passage. He said the Senate bill, in relation to cavalry, contained a provision to abolish corps of partisan rangers; but the Committee had deemed it too sweeping in its character, and had stricken it out. The House objected to the bill altogether, and refused to pass it. The Committee had instructed him to report the present bill, which they thought was demanded by the necessities of the service. It was a measure warmly urged by General Lee and other distinguished officers. The bill was debated, amended, and passed in the following shape: Section 1. The Congress of the confederate States of America do enact, That the act of Congress aforesaid be, an