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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 71 5 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 56 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 2 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 14 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 14 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 13 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 4 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 8 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 5 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. You can also browse the collection for Nelson A. Miles or search for Nelson A. Miles in all documents.

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g the American Civil War, was the Fifth New Hampshire Infantry. This statement does not include the Heavy Artillery, which, owing to their larger form of organization, will be considered separately from the ordinary regiments of the line. It lost 295 men, killed or mortally wounded in action, during its four years of service, from 1861 to 1865. It served in the First Division, Second Corps. This division was commanded, successively, by Generals Richardson, Hancock, Caldwell, Barlow, and Miles; and any regiment that followed the fortunes of these men was sure to find plenty of bloody work cut out for it. The losses of the Fifth New Hampshire occurred entirely in aggressive, hard, stand — up fighting; none of it happened in routs or through blunders. Its loss includes eighteen officers killed, a number far in excess of the usual proportion, and indicates that the men were bravely led. Its percentage of killed is also very large, especially as based on the original enrollment. The
oward, who had commanded Sedgwick's Division at Fredericksburg, was promoted to the command of the Eleventh Corps. At Chancellorsville the principal part of the Second Corps' fighting fell on Hancock's Division, its skirmish line, under Colonel Nelson A. Miles, distinguishing itself by a successful resistance to a strong attack of the enemy, making, one of the most interesting episodes in the history of that battle. During the fighting at Chancellorsville, Gibbon's (2d) Division remained at Fes. In November, 1864, General Hancock was assigned to other duty, and General Andrew A. Humphreys, chief of staff to the Army of the Potomac, succeeded to his position. He was in command during the final campaign, the divisions being under Generals Miles, William Hays and Mott. The corps fought its last battle at Farmville, April 7, 1865, two days before Lee's surrender. In this final action General Thomas A. Smyth, a brigadier in Hays' (2d) Division, was killed. Smyth was an officer with
Cold Harbor. Mustered out June 30, 1865. Sixty-First New York Infantry--Clinton Guard. Miles's Brigade — Barlow's Division--Second Corps. (1) Col. Francis C. Barlow; Major-Gen., U. S. V. (3) Col. Oscar K. Broady. (2) Col. Nelson A. Miles; Bvt. Major-Gen., U. S. A. (4) Col. George W. Scott; Bvt. Brig.-Gen., U. S. V. Losses. Officers. En. Men. Total. Killed and mortally fight. At Antietam the regiment captured two stands of colors, and at Fredericksburg, under Colonel Miles, it sustained a severe loss in proportion to its numbers, the colonel being severely woundedgainst the persistent attack of a large force of the enemy. This line was in charge of Colonel Nelson A. Miles of the Sixty-first New York, and the brilliancy of the affair became a matter of historrps about Spotsylvania, its losses there amounting to 34 killed, 126 wounded, and 9 missing. General Miles commanded the division at Farmville, where the Second Corps and the One Hundred and Forti