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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
n we made our way towards the left and found General Birney's men moving that way, who furnished us information about the road, and a guide, Colonel Hapgood of the 5th New Hampshire, corps officer of the day. He was a live Yankee, a thorough New Hampshire man — tall, sinewy, with a keen black eye, and a driving way about him. He was ornamented with a bullet-hole through his hat, another through the trousers, and a third on his sword scabbard. We rode forward till we struck the breastwork at Miles's Headquarters. It was a curious sight! Something like an Indian family camped half underground. Here was the breastwork, behind which were dug a number of little cellars, about two feet deep, and, over these, were pitched some small tents. And there you could see the officers sitting, with only their heads above ground, writing or perhaps reading; for it was a quiet time and there were no bullets or shells. We followed the line to its end, near by, and then rode through the pine woods
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 8 (search)
were able to come back, though some did limp merrily, and others were so stiff that, when once down, they could scarcely get up. A force of a few hundred cavalry was sent in the afternoon down the Vaughan road to reconnoitre, and see if they could see that any troops were moving against our rear, or against Warren. They got at dusk to Hatcher's Run, where the opposite bank was held by the enemy in a breastwork; and, after losing half a dozen men, our cavalry came back. December 9, 1864 Miles's division of the 2d Corps was sent to aid the cavalry in forcing Hatcher's Run. They marched out early and found several regiments holding the crossing; a severe skirmish followed; our poor men went into the icy water up to their armpits and drove off the Rebels, though not without some loss to us. I know the cavalry Lieutenant, whom I saw bringing in all those stragglers last night, was killed there. Then Miles built a bridge and sent over the cavalry, which went as far as within sight o
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
r give place to Maria Jane, your next younger sister. The gallant Humphreys gave us a review of Miles's division, on top of the concert; whereat General Meade, followed by a bespattered crowd of genrady bows. Captain--, Hey? What is that name? I can't read the writing. Murphy, suggests General Miles. Oh, dear me, of course, yes; Captain Murphy's bay gelding. No! red, suggests Miles. Ah, yo advance likewise. The General rode out in person to give Humphreys the necessary orders about Miles's division, and found him at Mrs. Rainie's, at the junction of the Quaker road and the plank. Tation. He was reported, however, as forming line of battle a mile or two beyond us. Immediately Miles's division marched up the Claiborne road, while Mott, followed by Hays (2d division, 2d Corps), e were covered with waggons that had parked ready to follow the army. Here too was the scene of Miles's fight of the 2d, and the Rebel breastworks, with scattered ammunition and dead artillery horse
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
ersburg, 165, 214, 242; Burnside and, 200; rumored removal, 204; force reduced, 210; good sleeper, 217; Grant and, 224; engineer, 246; report, 256; fraudulent votes, 264; services, 271; major-general, 283; pay, 287; bon-mot, 298; in Petersburg, 340; on Lee's surrender, 358; meets Lee, 360; letter to Lyman, 362. Meigs, Montgomery Cunningham, 248. Meherrin Bridge, 295. Mercier, —, chef, 265, 276. Merritt, Wesley, 68, 346. Mexicans at Headquarters, 23. Miles, Jeremiah, 206. Miles, Nelson Appleton, 150, 292, 322, 331, 337, 338. Milford, 119. Miller, Theodore, 324. Miller, William DeWitt, 225. Mills, Charles James, 233, 332, 338. Milroy's weary boys, 98. Mine Run, 55, 68. Mitchell, John Fulton Berrien, 48. Mitchell, William Galbraith, 82, 92, 134, 150, 226, 233, 253, 288. Moncure house, 122. Monocacy Bridge, 185. Montbarthe, Vicomte de, 254. Morale, in army, 115, 179. Morgan, Charles Hale, 233, 288. Morris, William Hopkins, 67. Morris, —, 312. Morton, Jame