hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 29 5 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 26 6 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 23 11 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 8 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 14, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 28, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for William Porcher Miles or search for William Porcher Miles in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

e spirit, a meeting of the prominent politicians of South Carolina was held at the residence of Senator Hammond, near Augusta, on the 25th of October, 1860. Gov. Gist, ex-Gov. Adams, ex-Speaker Orr, and the entire delegation to Congress, except Mr. Miles, who was kept away by sickness, were present, with many other men of mark. By this cabal, it was unanimously resolved that South Carolina should secede from the Union in the event of Lincoln's then almost certain election. Similar meetings ofward in the predetermined course, and thus exposed herself to imminent peril on behalf of their common and most cherished interest, Slavery. On the first day of the South Carolina Secession Convention, at Columbia, December 17, 1860, Hon. William Porcher Miles, M. C. from the Charleston District, one of the delegates, made a short speech against adjournment to Charleston, on account of the epidemic (small-pox) at Columbia; saying that he was just from Washington, where he had been in consulta
d to relieve him in this, but to no purpose. About this time, Maj. Anderson approached, to whom Wigfall announced himself (incorrectly) as a messenger from Gen. Beauregard, sent to inquire on what terms he would evacuate the fortress. Maj. Anderson calmly replied: Gen. Beauregard is already acquainted with my only terms. After a few more civil interchanges of words, to no purpose, Wigfall retired, and was soon succeeded by ex-Senator Chesnut, and ex-Representatives Roger A. Pryor and W. Porcher Miles, who assured Maj. A. that Wigfall had acted entirely without authority. Maj. A. thereupon ordered his flag, which had been lowered, to be raised again; but his visitors requested that this be delayed for further conference; and, having reported to Beauregard, returned, two or three hours afterward, with a substantial assent to Maj. Anderson's conditions. The latter was to evacuate the fort, his garrison to retain their arms, with personal and company property, and march out with the h
auregard promptly offered to lead the Hampton Legion into action, which he executed in a style unsurpassed and unsurpassable. Gen. Beauregard rode up and down our lines, between the enemy and his own men, regardless of the heavy fire, cheering and encouraging our troops. About this time, a shell struck his horse, taking his head off, and killing the horses of his Aids, Messrs. Ferguson and Hayward. Gen. Beauregard's Aids deserve honorable mention, particularly those just named, and Cols. W. Porcher Miles, James Chestnut, John L. Manning, and A. R. Chisholm. Gen. Johnston also threw himself into the thickest of the fight, seizing the colors of a Georgia regiment, and rallying them to the charge. His staff signalized themselves by their intrepidity, Col. Thomas being killed and Major Mason wounded. Your correspondent heard Gen. Johnston exclaim to Gen. Cocke, just at the critical moment, Oh, for four regiments His wish was answered; for in the distance our reinforcements appeared.
a, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Missouri, with others, boldly and broadly charged President Lincoln with wantonly inaugurating civil war, by his Proclamation calling out 75,000 militia for the defense of the Federal metropolis, it may be proper to accumulate evidence on this head. Here is what Wm. H. Russell, The Times's correspondent, who was in the South when Sumter was reduced, records in his Diary, under the date of April 20th, 1861, just after dining at Charleston with W. H. Trescott, W. Porcher Miles, Gov. Manning, and other pioneers of Disunion: The Secessionists are in great delight over Gov. Letcher's proclamation, calling out troops and volunteers; and it is hinted that Washington will be attacked, and the nest of Black Republican vermin, which haunt the capital, be driven out. Vi. The North Carolina Convention--an error corrected. It is stated on page 348, that the North Carolina Convention, which ultimately passed an Ordinance of Secession, was the same which the p