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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 21, 1863., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison, Index (search)
Martineau, Harriet, quoted, 195, 196, 248; her Martyr Age in America, 245; 105, 124. Massachusetts, southern attempt to enslave, 010-Io3. And see Boston. Matthew, Saint, Gospel of, quoted, 181-84. May, Samuel, Jr., 210, 211, 212. May, Samuel J., quoted, 73-75, 78-80, 81-86, 93-95, 196-98; converted to Abolition by G., 77 ff.; the angel of Anti-slavery, 78; and G., 80, 81; and the Lunt Committee, 124, 126, 127; 29, 32, 71, 138, 150, 227. Methodists, and Abolition, 208. Mill, John Stuart, 251. Milton, John, 165. Missouri, admission of, with slavery, Io. Missouri Compromise, 10, 25, 256, 258; repeal of, 10, 256, 258. Nashville, vigilance committee at, 76. National Anti-Slavery Society founded, 73 if.; 151. National Intelligencer, the, appeals to Otis, 52, 53. negro, the, how related to the beginning of the struggle between North and South, 25 f. New Organization, the, 153, 154. New Testament, the, and slavery's apologists, 200, 201. New York Heral
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, The woman's rights movement and its champions in the United States. (search)
we find William H. Channing, E. D. Draper, Frederick Douglass, Thomas Earle, Wendell Phillips, William Lloyd Garrison, Parker Pillsbury, Charles Burleigh, Hannah Darlington, Sarah Tyndall, Sarah R. May, S. C. Sargent, C. M. Shaw, Ellen and Marion Blackwell, Mary Adams, and Sojourner Truth. The proceedings of this convention were remarkable for their earnestness and ability. The reports, published both in England and America, in all the leading journals, first drew the attention of Mrs. John Stuart Mill to this subject, and prompted her able article in the Westminster review on The enfranchisement of women. Paulina Wright Davis was chosen president of the convention. Her opening address, an hour in length, was a very concise, and able presentation of the work to be done, and the manner of doing it. In this convention every phase of the question was discussed,--work, wages, property, education, and suffrage,by the ablest men and women in the country. After this, National Wom
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
ontinued, after leaving the University, to be by his conversation and personal ascendancy a leader among the same class of young men who had been his associates there. The impression he gave us was that of boundless strength, together with talents which combined with such apparent force of will and character seemed capable of dominating the world. Those who knew him, whether friendly to him or not, always anticipated that he would play a conspicuous part in public life. Autobiography of J. S. Mill, pp. 76-79, 118, 124, 126. At the University, Austin certainly was the only man who ever succeeded in dominating Macaulay. With his vigor and fervor, says the historian's biographer, his depth of knowledge and breadth of humor, his close reasoning illustrated by an expansive imagination, set off as these gifts were by the advantage, at that period of life so irresistible, of some experience of the world at home and abroad,—Austin was indeed a king among his fellows.—Trevelvan's Life of
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 22: England again, and the voyage home.—March 17 to May 3, 1840. —Age 29. (search)
unger sons. You, who have never been out of America, have no conception of the power of the aristocracy. You will not believe me influenced by any mad, democratic tendencies, when I say that England has trials of no common character to encounter. That she may go through them in peace I fervently hope. Although while in England his associations and friendships had no limitation of party or sect, he found his affinities on political and social questions among the Austins, Parkes, Grote, Mill, Molesworth, Senior, and others of their school. These were the political freethinkers of their time,—drawing their inspirations from Jeremy Bentham. Their fearlessness in speculations on the problems of society and government harmonized with tne natural tendency of Sumner's mind. While the favorits pupil of Story and Greenleaf, he was yet at no time of their strongly conservative type of thought; and he returned from Europe more than ever a doctrinaire. Letters. To George S. Hi
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
nstruction. Here and there some notice was taken of Mill and Positivism, and Edward's Freedom of the will y the empirical or positivistic philosophy of Comte, Mill, Lewes, Buckle, and Bain, and on the right by the diourier, and even Proudhon, or by Bentham, Grote, and Mill. Even the arch-skeptic Hume continued to be reprint acceptance very slowly. Toward the end of his life Mill testified that for one British philosopher who beliay, been brought up on Hamilton. But his reading of Mill converted Wright completely; and while never a disciple of Mill to the extent that Fiske was of Spencer, he was in a fair way to re-enforce and develop Mill's logl, See Book III, Chap. X. and his own reading of Mill and Spencer as well as of the great German philosophal monism. The empirical way of thought of Hume and Mill proved most congenial to one who was par excellence t against the old associationist psychology of Hume, Mill, Bain, and Spencer was to the effect that the sensat
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
uage, 480 Meyer, 585 Meyers, J. C., 162 Mezes, 246 n. Michigan (University), 177, 412 Michel Peroux, 594 Michelson, A. A., 585 Middle Ages, 458 Middle five, the, 147 Middle Kingdom, the, 145 Middleton, George, 298 Middle years, the, 96, 102, 108 Mighty dollar, the, 271 Mikado's Empire, the, 155 Mila ou la Mort de la Salle, 592 Miles, George H., 268 Miles, Nelson A., 29 Mil huit cent quatorze et Mil huit cent quinze, 596 Milk White Flag, a, 279 Mill, John Stuart, 229, 230, 233, 234, 245, 250, 251, 434, 441 Miller, Cincinnatus Hiner, 31, 53-56, 59, 275, 290, 581 Miller, Daniel, 585 Miller, Henry, 278, 279, 575, 576 Milton, 44, 49, 203, 460, 539, 542 Mind, 239 n. Mind's love for God, the, 224 Minister's charge, the, 81 Minister's Wooing, the, 72 Minnesota (University), 412 Mirele Efros, 608 Miscellaneous writings (Mrs. Eddy), 526 Miss Bellard's inspiration, 84 Missionary Herald, the, 155 Missions and missionarie
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index (search)
ttalion Artillery, 330; 2nd Regiment, Va. Cavalry, officers of. 330. Lyons, James, 99. Magruder, General J. B., 117. Mcguire, Dr., Hunter, 101; at Winchester in 1862, 226. McKinley, Major, Wm.. 110, 305. McRae, J. R., 359. Malvern Hill Battle of, 1, 50. Manassas First, skedaddle at, 269. Martin, Tom, execution of, by General Hooker, 129; Rev. S. Taylor, 101. Matthews, H. H., 341. Maximilian and Mexico 118. Meredith, General S. A.. 94. Miles, General N. A., 100. Mill, John Stuart, 118. Minor, Berkeley 332; Dr. C. L. C., 129. Montague, Governor A. J., 360. Moorman, Major M. N., 110, 306, 372. Mosby's Command, 90. Mott, Dr., Valentine, 81. Mulford, General J. E., 84. Natchez Miss., War times in, 135. Negro, The, Problem, 337. Newbern, Federal fleet at, 205. Nicholls, General F. T., 284. Nightingale, Florence, 228. North, Inconsistency of the, 82. O'Ferrall. Hon. C. T., 260. Ould, Hon., Robert, 84. Palmer, colonel, Wm. H., 112. Parke
The Daily Dispatch: March 21, 1863., [Electronic resource], The English press on the emancipation Society. (search)
may be emphatically described as nobodies. We are ready to grant that the painful obscurity of this personnel was no fault of the promoters of the meeting. They had labored hard to cajole individuals of real parts and imminence into attending. They had asked Johnson and Burke; but, as in the famous instance of "the Haunch of Venison," Johnson and Burke "couldn't come." Good old General Thompson sent ten pounds to the funds of the association, but stayed away; Mr. Forster, M. P., would have come, but he was bespoken for a meeting at Bradford; Mr. John Stuart Mill had no time to spare for anything of the kind; Professor Newman was unfortunately engaged to lecture at University College; Professor Cairnce was simply "unable to attend" Mr. W. Hargreaves was similarly incapacitated from coming, but sent instead a paragraph of florid nonsense about liberty, equality, and fraternity, and "the Beelzebub of the press," and Colonel Salwey had an appointment of long standing at Edisburgh.