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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 13: the siege and evacuation of Fort Sumter. (search)
n, John Lanagan, John Laroche, Deserted on the 22d of April, 1861. Frederick Lintner, John Magill, Frederick Meier, James Moore, William Morter, Patrick Neilan, John Nixon, Michael O'Donald, Robert Roe, William Walker, Joseph Wall, Edmund Walsh, Henry R. Walter, Herman Will, Thomas Wishnowski, Casper Wutterpel, Cornelius Baker, Thomas Carroll, Patrick Clancy, John Davis, James Digdam, George Fielding, Edward Gallway, James Gibbons, James Hays, Daniel Hough, John Irwin, James McDonald, Samuel Miller, John Newport, George Pinchard, Frank Rivers, Lewis Schroeder, Carl A. Sellman, John Thompson, Charles H. Tozer, William Witzmann. All of the officers but three were highly promoted during the war. Major Anderson was commissioned a brevet Major-General; Captains Foster and Doubleday were raised to full Major-Generals; Lieutenants Davis, Seymour, and Hall, were commissioned Brigadiers; and Surgeon Crawford received the same appointment. Lieutenant Snyder died in November following, an
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Miller, Samuel 1769-1850 (search)
Miller, Samuel 1769-1850 Ll.D., theologian; born in Dover, Del., Oct. 31, 1769; graduated at the University of Pennsylvania in 1789; minister of a Presbyterian church in New York City from 1793 to 1813, and was noted as a political and theological writer. From 1813 to 1849 he was Professor of Ecclesiastical History and Church Government in the Theological Seminary at Princeton. His published works are quite numerous. Dr. Miller was an early member of the American Philosophical Society. ogian; born in Dover, Del., Oct. 31, 1769; graduated at the University of Pennsylvania in 1789; minister of a Presbyterian church in New York City from 1793 to 1813, and was noted as a political and theological writer. From 1813 to 1849 he was Professor of Ecclesiastical History and Church Government in the Theological Seminary at Princeton. His published works are quite numerous. Dr. Miller was an early member of the American Philosophical Society. He died in Princeton, N. J., Jan. 7, 1850.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
is was the second longest session ever held; 16,972 bills introduced, nearly 1,400 became laws.] Louis Phillipe Albert d'orleans, Comte de Paris, volunteer aide on General McClellan's staff during the Civil War, arrives in New York......Oct. 3, 1890 Polygamy abolished as an institution of the Church of the Latter-day Saints at a general conference in Salt Lake City, Utah......Oct. 6, 1890 Daughters of the American Revolution organized at Washington......Oct. 11, 1890 Associate Justice Samuel Miller of the Supreme Court, struck with paralysis, Oct. 10, dies at Washington......Oct. 13, 1890 William W. Belknap, ex-Secretary of War, born 1829, dies at Washington, D. C.......Oct. 13, 1890 Chief of Police David C. Hennessy, of New Orleans, waylaid before his own home by Italian Mafia, to whose band he had traced a number of crimes, and killed, receiving six wounds......Oct. 15, 1890 Religious excitement among the Indians of the Northwest ( Messiah craze ) first appears
ripped of everything; fences were torn down, crops trampled up, and every species of vandalism that savages could think of, was practised. Hogs, sheep, cattle, poultry, were stolen and carried off, and when not needed for food were wantonly slaughtered and left to rot on the ground. Among others we have heard of as being thus brutally despoiled were Mrs. Poindexter, General Clay, Captain Armistead, Doctor Floyd, and N. W. Barksdale, on and near the Forest road; and on the Salem road, Samuel Miller, Major G. C. Hutter, and Doctor W. Owen. There were also others of whose names we have not been informed; and along the entire line of the enemy's march, as far as we can learn, the same scenes of plunder and robbery were enacted. Captain Paschal Buford was stripped of every-thing — cattle, horses, hogs, provisions, &c., all were taken; and so with Captain W. M. Smith, living near Lewry's, and all persons living on or within reach of the road. At Liberty the case was the same, and the
her friends shortly after her death, which occurred at Niagara Falls, July 27th, 1864. Margaret Elizabeth Breckinridge was born in Philadelphia, March 24th, 1832. Her paternal grandfather was John Breckinridge, of Kentucky, once Attorney-General of the United States. Her father, the Rev. John Breckinridge, D. D., was his second son, a man of talent and influence, from whom Margaret inherited good gifts of mind and heart, and an honored name. Her mother, who was the daughter of Rev. Samuel Miller, of Princeton, N. J., died when Margaret was only six years old, at which time she and her sister Mary went to live with their grandparents at Princeton. Their father dying three years afterwards, the home of the grandparents became their permanent abode. They had one brother, now Judge Breckinridge of St. Louis. Margaret's school-days were pleasantly passed, for she had a genuine love of study, an active intellect, and a very retentive memory. When her school education was over, s
– – – Special cor. Boston Evening Journal, Feb. 17, 1863, p. 4, cols. 3, 4. — – Feb. 14. Captured by the rebels. Boston Evening Journal, Feb. 25, 1863, p. 2, col. 6; March 6, p. 4, col. 4. — – – Particulars of her loss; from Chicago Tribune. Boston Evening Journal, March 4, 1863, p. 2, col. 1. — – – Short account; from New Orleans Era. Boston Evening Journal, April 29, 1863, p. 4, col. 2. Question of the hour. James R. Lowell. Atlantic, vol. 7, p. 117. Quincy, Gen. Samuel Miller. Campaigns of the civil war, rev. of: Vol. 1, Outbreak of rebellion, J. G. Nicolay; Vol. 2, Fort Henry to Corinth, Gen. M. F. Force; Vol. 3, The Peninsula, Gen. Alex. S. Webb. Atlantic, vol. 49, p. 407. — As colonel of 2d Regt. M. V. I.; colors not captured at Chancellorsville; correction of C. C. Coffin. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 4, p. 618. Quincy, J. P. Record of an obscure man, rev. of. Atlantic, vol. 9, p. 648. — Six months in the Federal States.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Paroles of the Army of Northern Virginia. (search)
ant S. J. Nettles, 3d Sergeant H. A. McIntosh, 4th Sergeant J. J. Durant, 5th Sergeant J. D. Hill, 1st Corporal E. L. Wilkins, 3d Corporal J. R. King, Private J. H. Barnes, A. Blackman, E. W. Boswell, J. W. Bradley, A. C. Byrd, E. Byrd, J. B. Clements, Jos. Clements, Jas. Coker, T. G. M. Dennis, Private J. P. Ellis, J. W. Fountain, C. J. Garner, C. R. King, W. M. King, T. D. King, W. D. Lewis, J. A. McDonald, M. E. McDonald, J. C. McIntosh, J. R. McKay, Samuel Miller, S. E. Morse, S. D. Onales, B. D. Padget, J. E. Polson. Co. F. 1st Sergeant J. J. Stringfellow, 2d Sergeant E. B. Mobley, 3d Sergeant J. G. Blair, 4th Sergeant J. S. Guy, 5th Sergeant S. M. McDill, 1st Corporal S. R. Williamson, 2d Corporal W. H. McConnell, Private J. F. Barber, S. Blair, R. Brandt, F. M. Chisolm, Wm. Coleman, J. K. Coleman, D. E. Dunlap, D. A. Evans, A. Gladden, H. H. Gooch, W. H. Hardin, W. A. Howell, Private S. Jackson, J. J. Le
own, Md., passed up the Northern Central Railroad. The train laid over at Monkton to allow another to pass, and the soldiers took advantage of the opportunity to commit several outrages in the village. They entered the store and tavern of Mr. Samuel Miller, and took all the liquor and bottles in his bar. From the store they took eggs and other provisions, a case of hats, medicines, &c. and all the change in the drawer. They visited almost every house near the station, and took all they couldhats, medicines, &c. and all the change in the drawer. They visited almost every house near the station, and took all they could lay their hands on in the way of edibles. The lieutenants and captains were appealed to, but without effect, but the Colonel finally drove the men into the cars, and the train started. Mr. Miller lost property to the value of $75. From what we can learn from the papers, the troops must have been Col. Dare's Regiment, recently stationed at Perryville, Cecil county.
A Stricken Household. --Four children, varying in age from one and a half to eleven years, of the family of Mr. Samuel Miller, of North Coventry Township, Chester county, Pa., died between the 4th and 30th of December last of diphtheria.
ghtly wounded in the thigh. Sergt-Maj B W Means, dangerously wounded through the lungs. --Moore, musician, severely wounded in the leg. Company A, Capt G L Strait — Killed: Sg't W E Lewis; privates B S Backstrom, William Moore, Samuel Miller, W L McFadden. T S Reid, and J M Fry. Wounded severely: Privates D S Dickey, (and missing,) J T Thomas, Wm Richens, Joshua Ritchens, J P Nati, W C Reid, G Amy (Brown, Perry Ferguson, J H Gaston, John Dunlop, B J Massey, L H Dye, Jno McCarthy R N Blanks, W N Elder, Lieut J C McFadden, Sg't J N Whitesides, private F Begham, Missing: Private John McGarity. Total, killed, wounded and missing, . Company B, Capt John White--Killed: Private W S F McFadden. Wounded severely: Sg't J P Miller, privates J M Caskie, W O Glover, H Johnston, B Merritt, and J S Nivens. Wounded slightly: Capt J M White, Jr 2d Lieut T M Wylis; privates B F Baker, Jas Epps, P Hargot, H Merritt, and W C Perry. Total, killed and wounded, 14. Company C
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