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kept the larger portion of my regiment together, and marched from the field in order, and on the march and near an open space where Colonel Heintzelman's column left the Centreville and Manassas road in the morning, and passed to the right, we, in conjunction with others, repulsed the enemy's cavalry, who attempted to charge. Before leaving the field a portion of the right wing, owing to the configuration of the ground and intervening woods, became detached, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Miller, whose gallantry was conspicuous throughout the entire battle, and who contested every inch of the ground with his forces thrown out as skirmishers in the woods, and succeeded in occupying the original ground on the right, after the repulse of a body of cavalry. I deem it worthy of remark that during a part of the engagement my regiment and that of the enemy, at some points, became so intermingled as scarcely to be able to distinguish friends from foes, and my forces made several
Doc. 46.-First Minnesota infantry. The following is a list of the officers: Colonel, Willis A. Gorman; Lieut.-Colonel, Stephen Miller; Major, William H. Dyke; Chaplain, E. D. Neill, D. D.; Surgeon, J. H. Stewart, M. D.; Adjutant, William B. Leach; Quartermaster and Commissary, Mark W. Downie; Commissary-Sergeant, Mahoney; Assistant-Surgeon, Charles La Boutiler; Sergeant-Major, E. H. Davis; Colonel's Aid, E. L. Sproat. Company B--Captain, A. C. Bromley; First Lieutenant, Mark W. Downie; Second Lieutenant, Mirror Thomas. Company C--Captain, William H. Acker; First Lieutenant, William B. Farrell; Second Lieutenant, Samuel Ragent. Company D--Captain, H. R. Putnam; First Lieutenant, George H. Woods; Second Lieutenant, De Witt C. Smith. Company I--Captain, John H. Fell; First Lieutenant, Joseph Harley; Second Lieutenant, Charles B. Halsey. Company F-Captain, Colwill; First Lieutenant, E. A. Welsh; Second Lieutenant, Anthony Hoyt. Company K-Captain, Henry C. Lester; First Lieutenan
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 71.-fight at Middle-Fork Bridge, Va., July 6, 1861. (search)
n the left arm; the ball entered at the elbow, and traversed the muscles of the arm seven or eight inches, ploughing up a ghastly furrow; the bone was not broken. David Edson, of Barnesville, Belmont County, slightly wounded in the right arm. Joseph Backus, of Newark, slightly wounded in the left leg. William Dening, of Hamilton, Butler County, had the skin above his right ear cut by a ball; seven or eight of the men received scratches, and had their clothing riddled. Captain Lawson says Mr. Miller, of Worthington, was the coolest and pluckiest fellow in the fight. He was the last to quit the field, and left the bushes twice to get a fair shot; but Dr. McMeans said every man of the party displayed good pluck. The wounded were brought to the hospital in wagons this morning, and are comfortable. Capt. Lawson and his men are confident that some were killed on the bridge. Seven were killed outside of the bridge. All accounts agree that the rebels were about three hundred strong, mos
continued to pour a galling fire into their disorganized masses. It was then evident that Totten's battery and Steele's little battalion were safe. Among the officers conspicuous in leading this assault were Adjutant Hezcock, Captains Burke, Miller, Maunter, Maurice, and Richardson, and Lieut. Howard, all of the First Missouri. There were others of the First Kansas and First Iowa who participated, and whose names I do not remember. The enemy then fled from the field. A few moments beforeto bivouac under trees and by camp-fires for the night. Where so many daring acts and valorous deeds were performed, it were almost impossible to single any one as worthy of especial notice. Among the latter, however, were Capts. Cavender and Miller, members of the ex-Legislature, Capt. Granger of the regulars, Major Porter of Iowa, Major Cloud of Kansas, Capt. Wood of the Kansas cavalry, and Capt. Wright of the Home Guards. Col. Bates, of the Iowa First, who had been confined for several da
heir loss is much heavier than ours; that while our dead were comparatively few, theirs were gathered in great heaps under the trees. He says that so many of their tents were destroyed by themselves, that not less than two-thirds of them would have to bivouac under trees and by camp-fires for the night. Where so many daring acts and valorous deeds were performed, it were almost impossible to single any one as worthy of especial notice. Among the latter, however, were Capts. Cavender and Miller, members of the ex-Legislature, Capt. Granger of the regulars, Major Porter of Iowa, Major Cloud of Kansas, Capt. Wood of the Kansas cavalry, and Capt. Wright of the Home Guards. Col. Bates, of the Iowa First, who had been confined for several days with a fever and diarrhea, mounted his horse and attempted to go to the field of battle on the evening preceding it, but was compelled to return to town, much to his regret, after marching two or three miles with the column. On the march out ma