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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). You can also browse the collection for William DeWitt Miller or search for William DeWitt Miller in all documents.

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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
down a large force to drive him off. They began attacking say about one o'clock and were severely repulsed, till evening; but the last news is, that they made a desperate attempt on all sides and broke through a part of our right, just at nightfall. Hancock hoped to retake the part of the line lost, with the reinforcements coming up; but we have not yet heard the result. I feel rather anxious, though I don't fear for Hancock's safety; but I like to see him fully successful. Oh, bah! Captain Miller is just in (this is eleven o'clock at night). Hancock has lost eight guns — among them, I am told, Sleeper's battery. Poor Sleeper was here this afternoon, wounded in the arm. It is too much all one way in this business, it really is! I don't like to complain, because it troubles you, but it must break out occasionally. I get so mad and so bothered. For, when we have no good chance, or almost none, when our best undertakings fall through, I lose confidence in each move, and, when I h
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
t the morning's work. . . . Brevet Brigadier McLaughlen got taken in trying to maintain his line --a good officer. He was the one who had been five days in Boston and told me he was so tired that he thought he should go right back. A certain Major Miller was captured and sent, with a guard of four men, a little to the rear. They sat in a bomb-proof for protection and Miller did so describe the glories of Yankeedom to his captors, that, when we retook the work, they all deserted and came over Miller did so describe the glories of Yankeedom to his captors, that, when we retook the work, they all deserted and came over with him! Then we kept on and got out at our own domus, where General Meade (it being then about 11.30 A. M.) telegraphed sundry orders to his generals; wherefrom resulted, at 12.15, the greatest bang, bang, whang, from good Duke Humphrey, who, spectacles on nose, rushed violently at the entrenched skirmish line of the enemy and captured the same, with the double view of making a reconnaissance and a diversion, and furthermore of showing the Johns that we were not going to be pitched into witho
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
r, 217; Grant and, 224; engineer, 246; report, 256; fraudulent votes, 264; services, 271; major-general, 283; pay, 287; bon-mot, 298; in Petersburg, 340; on Lee's surrender, 358; meets Lee, 360; letter to Lyman, 362. Meigs, Montgomery Cunningham, 248. Meherrin Bridge, 295. Mercier, —, chef, 265, 276. Merritt, Wesley, 68, 346. Mexicans at Headquarters, 23. Miles, Jeremiah, 206. Miles, Nelson Appleton, 150, 292, 322, 331, 337, 338. Milford, 119. Miller, Theodore, 324. Miller, William DeWitt, 225. Mills, Charles James, 233, 332, 338. Milroy's weary boys, 98. Mine Run, 55, 68. Mitchell, John Fulton Berrien, 48. Mitchell, William Galbraith, 82, 92, 134, 150, 226, 233, 253, 288. Moncure house, 122. Monocacy Bridge, 185. Montbarthe, Vicomte de, 254. Morale, in army, 115, 179. Morgan, Charles Hale, 233, 288. Morris, William Hopkins, 67. Morris, —, 312. Morton, James St. Clair, 167. Morton, Samuel George, 167. Morton's Ford, 68, 69. Mott, Gershom, 92, 93,