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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for William J. Miller or search for William J. Miller in all documents.

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of Gen. Banks, had been stationed in the rear to burn the bridge across Cedar Creek, three miles from Strasburgh, after all had passed except the cavalry, under Gen. Hatch, who. were yet to come up and would ford the river. While they were besmearing the bridge with tar, unsuspecting any danger, the enemy charged down upon them from the mountain on the left, cutting them up in a most unmerciful manner, and capturing all of them except five. These are the names of those who escaped — W. J. Miller, Wm. B. Dah, Robert Gilchrist, Herman Clingman, Benjamin Reynolds, and Theodore Bardsall. All the rest are gone. The others, whether killed, wounded or prisoners, it is impossible for me to ascertain. More information may possibly be received soon. The rapid flight of cavalry caused a great panic among the teamsters, who fled from their wagons, while some upset them and others of them broke down; cattle got loose and joined in the general stampede, and horses breaking loose, joine
nth Massachusetts, now under the command of Capt. Miller, the Ninety-third Pennsylvania, Col. McCartMajor Robert M. West, (Flood's, McCarthy's and Miller's,) in Couch's division, performed most efficient service. The conduct of Miller's battery was admirable. Having a central position in the fore when the enemy were rushing in upon our right, Miller threw his case and canister among them, doing uts. Draper and Hurlbut, Capt. McMahon and Lieut. Miller, volunteer aids, and Capt. Fuller, Divisioite the Eighty-first Pennsylvania regiment, Col. Miller, they said: Do not fire; we are Owen's men.ent is one of Birney's brigade on my left. Col. Miller had his regiment at an aim, and now recovermand, the enemy having begun to fall back. Col. Miller of the Eighty-first Pennsylvania, and Lieutptured was the Empire battery, of New-York, Capt. Miller. The guns were new brass field-pieces, knod, but the pieces have been turned over to Captain Miller, of the Washington artillery. Col. D. G[3 more...]
duct of Major Humphrey, Captains Cameron, Cowan, Blakemore and Perkins; Lieuts. Benton, Hillier, Shear, Conn, Butler and Smith, and First Sergeant Clark, of the Ninth Illinois cavalry, and Capt. Williams, Lieuts. Madison and Ballou, and First Sergeant Miller, of Bowen's cavalry battalion. My thanks are due to Surgeon Jas. A. Brackett, for his care of the wounded, and to Battalion-Adjutant Blackburne, Quartermaster Price, and Sergeant-Major George A. Price, Ninth Illinois cavalry. The enent out--thirty-eight returned, laden with corn, bacon, flour, vinegar, etc. Col. Brackett speaks in the highest terms of the conduct of Major Humphrey of the Ninth Illinois cavalry, Capt. Williams, and Lieuts. Madison and Ballou, and First Sergeant Miller, of Bowen's Missouri cavalry battalion; as also of Capts. Burgh, Knight, Cowen, Blakemore and Perkins, and Lieuts. Benton, Hillier, Shear, Conn, Butler and Smith; Battalion-Adjutant Blackburn, and Sergeant-Major George A. Price; and espec
mpose these two regiments. Col. Thomas H. Hunt, of the Fifth, was in command of the brigade, and received a serious shot in the left hip while actively engaged on the field. He is a model soldier and the beau ideal of an officer, and his fall occasioned a pang of regret in the minds of all his men. Lieut.-Col. Caldwell and Capt. Cripps Wickliffe were worthy of their regiment, which exhibits the heaviest loss of any on the field. The Fourth Kentucky was without field-officers, but under Capt. Miller it proved a host, bearing through the heat of the fray its tattered and bullet-riddled banner, now thrice consecrated to glory by baptism of fire and blood. I speak of the Kentucky regiments more in detail, because I know more of their conduct, and for the reason that they bore the brunt of the fight. But this was only in accordance with the promise of Gen. Breckinridge, who, in a brief address a few days before, told his brave, noble and ragged Kentuckians that he would lead them where
First Lieutenant Robeson and Second Lieutenants Grafton, Oakey and Browning, wounded — the latter severely, and Second Lieutenant Miller, missing. Second Lieutenant Heirvack, of the Zouaves d'afrique, is also missing. The loss of the regiment so f Corporal,) George W. Murphy, Joseph Hoever, Rolan Clark, William Light, William McCoy, Thomas Cully, Elmore Davis, William J. Miller, William Woodberry, William Boggs, John Vansickle, Joseph Servings, George W. Turner, Ira Hudson, Alonzo Allison, Wslowly: Tell Gen. Burnside this is the battle of the war. He must hold his ground till dark at any cost. I will send him Miller's battery. I can do nothing more. I have no infantry. Then as the messenger was riding away he called him back. Tell rs continually, and especially those who made themselves conspicuous in the batteries. In this manner the company of Captain Miller, of the Washington artillery, was nearly disabled, only two out of his four guns being fully manned. As it occupied
eed, and proved themselves able and faithful in the discharge of duty, there remains the consolation that they died gloriously in the defence of as righteous a cause as a man could fight for. I have also to report Major Savage, wounded twice and a prisoner; Captains Quincy and Russell, prisoners; Surgeon Leland, wounded slightly while attending wounded men on the field; First Lieutenant Robeson and Second Lieutenants Grafton, Oakey and Browning, wounded — the latter severely, and Second Lieutenant Miller, missing. Second Lieutenant Heirvack, of the Zouaves d'afrique, is also missing. The loss of the regiment so far as at present known amounts to five commissioned officers killed, six wounded, and three missing, out of twenty-two in action; twenty-five non-commissioned officers and privates killed, ninety-five wounded, and thirty-seven missing, out of four hundred and seventy-four in action. The company of Zouaves d'afrique, attached to this regiment, honorably and creditably di
Low. Prisoners on Parole--Captain William Kerr; First Sergt. Jos. Senior.; Fourth Sergeant Gilbert Holman; Fifth Sergt. Enoch Abrams; privates Adam Ralls, Moses Billingsly, John H. Clifton, John C. Corbin, William Corbin, (Second Corporal,) Harvey Zimmerman, (Third Corporal,) Julius C. Burgoyne, (Fifth Corporal,) Charles Lair, (Sixth Corporal,) Henry Conaway, (Seventh Corporal,) George W. Murphy, Joseph Hoever, Rolan Clark, William Light, William McCoy, Thomas Cully, Elmore Davis, William J. Miller, William Woodberry, William Boggs, John Vansickle, Joseph Servings, George W. Turner, Ira Hudson, Alonzo Allison, William Pettigrew, Alex. S. Kerr, Franklin Priest, Isaac Summers, Ben. F. Clifton, Calvin Rail, William Halsted, William Stewart, (fifer,) John F. Farner, Thomas Moffit. Robert Northern, William A. Kerr, Wm. O. Kerr, Jesse B. Stevens, Adam Pettis, Wm. D. Hasper, Benj. F. Miller, Wm. H. Myers, Matthias Seegar, Jas. W. Lyons. Missing--Second Lieut. William G. Plummer; Se
one order given or withheld, when the history of the battle is only to be written in thoughts and purposes and words of the General. Burnside's messenger rides up. His message is: I want troops and guns. If you do not send them, I cannot hold my position half an hour. McClellan's only answer for the moment is a glance at the western sky. Then he turns and speaks very slowly: Tell Gen. Burnside this is the battle of the war. He must hold his ground till dark at any cost. I will send him Miller's battery. I can do nothing more. I have no infantry. Then as the messenger was riding away he called him back. Tell him if he cannot hold his ground, then the bridge, to the last man!--always the bridge! If the bridge is lost, all is lost. The sun is already down; not half an hour of daylight is left. Till Burnside's message came it had seemed plain to every one that the battle could not be finished to-day. None suspected how near was the peril of defeat, of sudden attack on exhau
severingly press close up to our ranks, so near, indeed, that their supporting batteries had to cease firing lest they should kill their own men, but just as often were they driven back by the combined elements of destruction which we brought to bear upon them. It was an hour when every man was wanted. The sharp-shooters of the enemy were picking off our principal officers continually, and especially those who made themselves conspicuous in the batteries. In this manner the company of Captain Miller, of the Washington artillery, was nearly disabled, only two out of his four guns being fully manned. As it occupied a position directly under the eye of Gen. Longstreet, and he saw the valuable part it was performing in defending, the centre, that officer dismounted himself from his horse, and assisted by his Adjutant-General, Major Sorrel, Major Fairfax and General Drayton, worked one of the guns until the crisis was passed. To see a general officer wielding the destinies of a great f
n found that it was impossible to draw them out, and as they had eight men to our one, I concluded that it would not be prudent to attempt to drive them out of the houses. It was impossible for me to learn the number killed and wounded of the enemy, it being dark, and many of them in houses. Our men saw three killed and ten wounded. I put their loss at ten killed and twenty wounded. We had but two men slightly wounded. My officers and men fought well. Capt. Peabody, Lieuts. Biser and Miller, and Capt. Gibbs, are among those that distinguished themselves. I am, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Robert R. Lawther, Colonel Missouri P. R. The P. R., of whom Lawther signs himself Colonel, are the Partisan Rangers, permission to raise which band of guerrillas is given from Richmond in the rebel commission copied below. War Department, Richmond, May 29, 1862. Major Robert R. Lawther, Present: sir: Upon the recommendation of Major-Gens. Price and Van Dorn y