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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 19, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for William R. Miller or search for William R. Miller in all documents.

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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: Marylanders in the campaigns of 1861. (search)
orum appearing, they adjourned until the next day. The climate of Frederick was disagreeable to many of the protesters at that particular season. But Major Copeland was equal to the emergency. He closely picketed the town and held everybody in who was in, and took everybody in who wanted to go out. On the 18th he arrested Milton Y. Kidd, the chief clerk of the house, and his assistant, Thomas H. Moore; William Kilgour, secretary of the senate, and his assistant, L. P. Carmark, and John M. Brewer, reading clerk of the senate, and William E. Salmon, Elbridge G. Kilbourne, Thomas J. Claggett, Philip F. Raisin, Andrew Kessler, Josiah H. Gordon, James W. Maxwell, R. C. McCubbin, George W. Landing, Dr. Bernard Mills, William R. Miller, Clark J. Durant, John I. Heckart and J. Lawrence Jones, members of the house; E. Riley, printer of the house and editor of the Annapolis Republican, and a number of citizens of Frederick pointed out by the citizens of the place who were greatly assisting.
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: Maryland under Federal military power. (search)
manded by Colonel DeWitt. The Fourth regiment, commanded by Colonel Sudburgh, was composed of Germans. The First and Second Maryland artillery companies were commanded by Captains Hampton and Thomson, and the First Maryland cavalry by Lieutenant-Colonel Miller. These first forces raised for the Union in Maryland were, with the exception of the First regiment, mainly composed of foreigners, aliens by birth and aliens to the institutions, ideals and motives that for nine generations had formotly engaged at Cedar Run, and lost heavily. Major Kennedy and over one hundred men were killed and wounded. They also lost over thirty-three per cent of the command at Sharpsburg, killed and wounded. The First regiment of cavalry, Lieutenant-Colonel Miller and Maj. James M. Deems, served under Generals Buford and Sigel in the army of the Potomac, in 1862. The Potomac home brigade, Col. William P. Maulsby, and the Purnell Legion, were enlisted and organized as home guards for home servi