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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 7: Atlantic coast defenses.-assigned to duty in Richmond as commander in chief under the direction of the Southern President. (search)
, by uniting with Anderson's force between Fredericksburg and Richmond, attack and possibly destroy McDowell, then at Fredericksburg. Banks had some twenty thousand men at Harrisonburg watching General Edward Johnson, and six thousand men, under Milroy and Schenck, had moved west of the mountains, and were in front of Johnson, while Fremont was marching with ten thousand men to join them. Evading Banks at Harrisonburg, Jackson moved to Staunton, joined his force with Johnson's, and defeated Milroy and Schenck; Ewell marched then from Gordonsville to the Valley, and Banks fell back to Strasburg. Jackson, having disposed of the two Federal commanders, returned with great swiftness, united with Ewell, defeated the Federal forces at Front Royal, and then pushed on with great rapidity to attack Banks, who, hearing of his approach, fell back to Winchester, where he was defeated and followed to the Potomac River. The defeat of the Federal troops in the Valley, and Jackson's presence on
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 11: Chancellorsville. (search)
ostilities beyond the Potomac. This embraced the expulsion from the Valley of Virginia of the Federal force under General Milroy. On the 2d of June Ewell's Corps marched for Culpeper Court House, and a day or two afterward Lee followed with Lon time Imboden's cavalry was moved to Romney to keep the troops guarding the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad from re-enforcing Milroy. On the 13th Ewell was in line of battle in front of Winchester, and next day he stormed and carried the works there, MiMilroy, the Union commander, and a few of his men alone escaping. Four thousand prisoners, twenty-eight pieces of superior artillery, wagons, horses, small arms, ordnance, commissary and quartermaster stores were captured. Ewell then entered Marylandought it possible that fifteen thousand of Ewell's men can now be at Winchester? and later tells him that the enemy have Milroy surrounded at Winchester, and Tyler at Martinsburg, and asks him if he could help them if they could hold out a few days,
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
ttapony River, 338. Matthews, John, 9. Maxey, General, killed at Fredericksburg, 233. Mayflower, slaves on, 83. Meade, Bishop, 95. Meade, General George G., succeeds Hooker, 269; his character, 269; statement by, 299; censured, 306; mentioned, 227, 228, 277, 278, 283, 302, 304. Meagher's Irish brigade, 231. Meigs, General, 107. Merrimac frigate, 138. Merritt, General, Wesley, mentioned, 333, 373. Mexican Republic, 31. Mexican treaty, 40. Miles, Colonel, 203. Milroy, General, mentioned, 143, 262, 263, 264. Minnigerode, Rev. Dr., 379. Mitchell, Private W. B., 204. Moltke, Field-Marshal, 261, 423. Molino del Rey, 41. Monocacy, battle of, 351. Mont St. Jean, Waterloo, 421. Monroe, James, I. Montezuma's gifts, 31. Moore, Anne, 20. Morales, General, 35. Mosby, Colonel, John, 183. Mount Vernon, Ala., 99. Mount Vernon plate, 94. Mount Vernon, Va., 71. Napier, General, quoted, 148. Napoleon at Austerlitz, 247; at Waterloo, 278, 4