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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 248 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 78 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 65 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 63 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 7 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for R. H. Milroy or search for R. H. Milroy in all documents.

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ort of Brig.-General Milroy. headquarters Milroy's brigade, camp near Franklin, Va., May 14. vely assisted us, I owe my warmest thanks. R. H. Milroy, Brigadier-General. W. G. George, A. A.G. property, except of some stores, for which Gen. Milroy was entirely without the means of transportent regiments engaged. At three o'clock, Gen. Milroy having reported to me that his scouts infor one thousand seven hundred and sixty-eight of Milroy's brigade, about five hundred of the Eighty-sein. Too much praise cannot be awarded to Gen. Milroy himself, to Colonel McLean, Seventy-fifth O, when the rebels evacuated Camp Allegheny, Gen. Milroy, with that energy and fearless determinatiols for several hours, and still they came. Gen. Milroy, at this moment, came up and ordered Capt. lf theirs, and our position a poor one; but Gen. Milroy said he would not yield a foot to treason, s. During the early part of the engagement Gen. Milroy was superintending both the battle and plan[12 more...]
nd placing my batteries so as to support Brig.-Gen. Milroy, whose brigade, preceded mine in the marnto the rear of a line of woods, through which Milroy was passing also to the right. These woods atsing through the skirt of the wood in which Gen. Milroy had advanced, went over some wheat-fields, gby's battery, and send it to the relief of Gen. Milroy. This was immediately done. Reaching the old my ground I might remain, but stating that Milroy's brigade, my supporting force on the left, hater the wood. At the head of that band was Gen. Milroy. He never asks his men to go where he willut he still deals out the deadly missiles. Gen. Milroy has his horse disabled by a ball, but he exack also. A messenger was accordingly sent to Milroy, telling him to retire in good order. But thie of battle, Schenck now taking the centre and Milroy the right. The American flag floated grandly , wounded and missing. Stahl's brigade,427 Milroy's brigade,118 Bohlen's brigade80 Cluseret's [6 more...]
n M. Stanton, Secretary of War: there was no collision with the enemy after dark last night. This morning we renewed the march against him, entering the woods in battle order, his cavalry appearing on our flanks, Gen. Blenker had the left, Gen. Milroy the right, and Gen. Schenck the centre, with a reserve of Gen. Stahl's brigade and Gen. Bayard's. The enemy was found to be in full retreat on Port Republic, and our advance found his rear-guard barely across the river, and the bridge in flameand one of his regiments alone, the Eighth New-York, has buried sixty-five. The Garibaldi Guard, next after, suffered most severely, and following this regiment, the Forty-fifth New-York, the Bucktail Rifles, of General Bayard's brigade, and General Milroy's brigades. One of the Bucktail companies has lost all of its officers, commissioned and non-commissioned. The loss in General Schenck's brigade was less, although he inflicted severe loss on the enemy, principally by artillery fire. O
Doc. 53.-Fremont's pursuit of Jackson. New-York Tribune account. Fremont's headquarters, Mount Jackson, Va., June 3, 1862. Gen. Fremont left Franklin on Sunday, May twenty-fifth. His troops were exhausted by previous forced marches to relieve Schenck and Milroy, from which they had not had time to recruit, and were weak from want of food. The first seven miles of road were only just not absolutely impassable by wagons. It was just such a road as cannot be found in the East, nor where an army has not passed. Wounded and sick were left at Franklin, because an attempt to carry them would have killed them. Nevertheless, with all its train of wagons, the army marched fifteen miles the first day. The next it reached Petersburgh, thirty miles from Franklin, at noon, and halted till Tuesday morning. Orders were then issued that knapsacks, tents, and baggage of every description that could possibly be dispensed with should be left behind. The knapsacks were stored in houses
ed was very severe. Their retreat is almost by an impassable road, along which many wagons were left in the woods, and wagon-loads of blankets, clothing, and other equipments are piled up in all directions. During the evening many of the rebels were killed by shells from a battery of General Stahl's brigade. General Ashby, who covered the retreat with his whole cavalry force and three regiments of infantry, and who exhibited admirable skill and audacity, was among the killed. General Milroy made a reconnoissance, to-day, about seven miles on the Port Republic road, and discovered a portion of the enemy's forces encamped in the timber. J. C. Fremont, Major-General Commanding. New-York Tribune account. Fremont's headquarters, Harrisonburgh, Va., June 7, 1862. The march from Newmarket, yesterday, was without opposition, until the advance — guard reached Harrisonburgh. Rebel cavalry showed themselves occasionally in front, but not in large numbers. They were draw
him to push forward his advance to Waterloo. Milroy's brigade, constituting the advance of his corneral Schurz to pass the river, and follow General Milroy, and take position behind him. The divisiois was correct, I directed the brigades of General Milroy and Colonel McLean to advance against the r regiments were sent forward to relieve Brig.-Gen. Milroy, whose brigade had valiantly disputed ths on our right, with Gen. Stahl's brigade. Gen. Milroy, with his brigade, with the assistance of srder to connect my line of skirmishers with Gen. Milroy's on my left. I pushed my left wing rapidlcasioned by the extension of my line toward Gen. Milroy's right. The Twenty-ninth New-York remaineanced in excellent order, but did not find General Milroy, whose command had gone further to the lefhe returned, however, we were requested by General Milroy to assist him, as he was very heavily preseral Stahl's brigade that had been sent to General Milroy's assistance, having accomplished its obje[31 more...]
engaged until daybreak in getting theirs into the positions for the expected conflict of yesterday assigned to them. At daybreak yesterday morning, the sharpshooters of the enemy were found precisely where their front was at the close of Saturday's battle, and skirmishing with ours immediately commenced. Their forces had, however, disappeared from sight. At sunrise a rebel brigade, supported by artillery, emerged from the woods in the front, and just as they got into line of battle, Gen. Milroy opened on them with his battery of Wiard guns, which seemed to sweep off an entire company or two, the rest instantly taking to their heels for the cover of the woods. Shortly afterwards Gen. Bayard, who continued, as before, in the extreme front, scouting to the right and left with his cavalry, reported them filing in force in both those directions, as though aiming to flank us on both sides. General Pope immediately despatched Tower's division of McDowell's corps to follow, watch and
in has arrived. I think it may be useful. Gen. Milroy burnt the bridge at Waterloo before he retiis was correct, I directed the brigades of General Milroy and Colonel McLean to advance against the tion parallel with the Sudley Spring road. Gen. Milroy, with his brigade and one battery, was direorward, we maintained our position, which Generals Milroy and Schurz had occupied in the morning. McLean. In executing this order, however, Gen. Milroy directed his brigade more to the rear than rder to connect my line of skirmishers with Gen. Milroy's on my left. I pushed my left wing rapidl, in order to establish the connection with Gen. Milroy, which however, was soon effected. Hardlhen the fire commenced near the point where Gen. Milroy's right touched my left. I placed the battng, early, the engagement was commenced by General Milroy on our right, in which we soon after took diately ordered to proceed with his brigade to Milroy's support. It was about this time, one or two[30 more...]