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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 2 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 7 1 Browse Search
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 7, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 2 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 2 2 Browse Search
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neral Davies to do the work. Major McIrwin led the charge, accompanied by Captains Downing and Mitchel, and Lieutenant Jones, and supported by two batteries. General Custer, whose irrepressible galame up, armed only with his riding whip, compelling many a man to surrender at discretion. Captain Mitchel ordered a rebel to help limber up the guns. He replied with perfect coolness that he was n going to help the Yankees capture their guns. He again received the order and again refused. Mitchel then drew his sabre and said: Now do as you are ordered. This final pointed argument prevailede rebel said: Well, if I must, I suppose I must. Perhaps the incident contains a moral. Captain Mitchel then rallied the men and charged through the town, which in a few minutes was ours also. Wk movement was delayed by a deep and almost impassable ravine. At one point Captains Hasty and Mitchel fought the enemy, they having five to our one. After taking Culpeper, we drove the enemy till
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 7: sea-coast defences..—Brief description of our maritime fortifications, with an Examination of the several Contests that have taken place between ships and forts, including the attack on San Juan d'ulloa, and on St. Jean d'acre (search)
efensive army could be raised. The works of Flushing were never intended to close up the Scheldt, and of course could not intercept the passage of shipping; but they were not reduced by the English naval force, as has sometimes been alleged. Col. Mitchel, of the English service, says that the fleet kept up so tremendous a fire upon the batteries, that the French officers who had been present at Austerlitz and Jena, declared that the cannonade in these battles had been a mere jeu d'enfans in coking of the general contest between the two lines, says: The Crown-battery did not come at all into action. An English writer says distinctly: ( The works (fortifications) of Copenhagen were absolutely untouched at the close of the action. Colonel Mitchel, the English historian, says: Lord Nelson never fired a shot at the town or fortifications of Copenhagen; he destroyed a line of block-ships, prames, and floating batteries that defended the sea approach to the town; and the Crown. Prince,
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army, Appendix. Oration at West Point. (search)
where death most revelled, who more than once told me that he believed and hoped that his long career would end amid the din of battle: he died at home from the effects of the hardships of his campaigns. That most excellent soldier, the elegant C. F. Smith, whom many of us remember to have seen so often on this plain, with his superb bearing, escaped the bullet to fall a victim to the disease which has deprived the army of so many of its best soldiers. John Buford, cool and intrepid; Mitchel, eminent in science; Plummer, Palmer, and many other officers and men, lost their lives by sickness contracted in the field. But I cannot close this long list of glorious martyrs without paying a sacred debt of official duty and personal friendship. There was one dead soldier who possessed peculiar claims upon my love and gratitude. He was an ardent patriot, an unselfish man, a true soldier, the beau ideal of a staff officer: he was my aide-de-camp, Colonel Colburn. There is a lesso
Chicago, April 19.--When Gen. Mitchel reached Decatur, Alabama, on his bridge expedition, he took possession of the telegraph-office and cut the wires, leaving Decatur and Corinth only in telegraph communication. Subsequently Beauregard sent a message to Jeff Davis, demanding reinforcements for Corinth, and declaring that otherwise he could not hold his position. General Mitchel answered the despatch and promised the reinforcements.--Chicago Tribune, April 19. Chicago, April 19.--When Gen. Mitchel reached Decatur, Alabama, on his bridge expedition, he took possession of the telegraph-office and cut the wires, leaving Decatur and Corinth only in telegraph communication. Subsequently Beauregard sent a message to Jeff Davis, demanding reinforcements for Corinth, and declaring that otherwise he could not hold his position. General Mitchel answered the despatch and promised the reinforcements.--Chicago Tribune, April 19.
Beauregard's cipher despatch.--The following is a telegraphic despatch, which was found in the office at Huntsville, Ala., at the time of its occupation by Gen. Mitchel. It is in a simple and easy cipher, which required Gen. Mitchel and his aids about twenty minutes to translate: [Original.] Corinth, April 9. To Gen. Samuel Cooper, Richmond, Va.: All present probabilities are that whenever the enemy moves on this position he will do so with an over-whelming force of not less than Gen. Mitchel and his aids about twenty minutes to translate: [Original.] Corinth, April 9. To Gen. Samuel Cooper, Richmond, Va.: All present probabilities are that whenever the enemy moves on this position he will do so with an over-whelming force of not less than yrzole xriy lohkjnap men, by wna ahc vkjlyi hate nqhkl lorite xrmy lohkjnap yx31 wlrmqj mna phia may possibly shrakj ra n xyc pnejcrlo nghkl xrlly 5a lohkjnap vhmy. Can we not be reinforced xrhn dyvgzilhaj nive. If defeated here cy thjy loy vrjq mnt3yc nap dchqn4te hki wnkjy whereas we could even afford to lose for a while wonilyjlha nap inmzu5yl for the purpose of defeating qkyt4j nive which would not only insure us the valley of Mississippi but our independence. P. G. T. Beauregard. [Tr
1. Mitchel. by W. Francis Williams. Hung be the heavens with black. His mighty life was burned away By Carolina's fiery sun; The pestilence that walks by day Smote him before his course seemed run. The constellations of the sky, The Pleiades, the Southern Cross, Looked sadly down to see him die, To see a nation weep his loss. “Send him to us,” the stars might cry; “You do not feel his worth below; Your petty great men do not try The measure of his mind to know. “Send him to us-this is his place, Not 'mid your puny jealousies; You sacrificed him in your race Of envies, strifes and policies. “His eye could pierce our vast expanse, His ear could hear our morning songs, His mind, amid our mystic dance, Could follow all our myriad throngs. ”Send him to us! no martyr's soul, No hero slain in righteous wars, No raptured saint could e'er control A holier welcome from the stars. “ Take him, ye stars! take him on high, To your vast realms of boundless space; But onc
ntry. Lieutenant Jordan, of the Twenty-eighth Alabama, conducted himself in a most conspicuous manner, and I regret to say was killed during the action. Of the same regiment, Captains Hopkins and Ford, Lieutenant Graham and Acting Adjutant Wood, throughout the action, were distinguished for their gallant conduct. Captain Reise, A. Q. M., and Commissary Sergeant Craig, were efficient in the discharge of their duties in their respective departments. Thirty-fourth Alabama regiment, Lieutenants Mitchel, Lambert, Oliver, Crochett, and Bickerstaff, behaved in a manner to attract attention. I cannot close my report without referring specially to the conduct and bearing of Colonel J. C. Reid, commanding, and Major W. L. Butler, Twenty-eighth Alabama regiment; Colonel J. F. Pressley, commanding Tenth South Carolina; Colonel N. N. Davis, commanding, and Lieutenant Colonel B. Sawyer, Twenty-fourth Alabama regiment, and Major Slaughter, commanding Thirty-fourth Alabama regiment, and to t
to Lieutenant-Colonel Ripley, of the First Artillery Battalion. Captain Ransom Calhoun was stationed at Fort Moultrie, and Captain Hallonquist at the Enfilade or masked battery. They were assisted by Lieutenants Wagner, Rhett, Yates, Valentine, Mitchel, and Parker. Captain Butler was on duty at the mortar battery, east of Fort Moultrie. Captain J. R. Hamilton commanded his own floating battery and the Dahlgren gun. Captain Martin was at the Mount Pleasant mortars; Captain George S. Thomas at Fom the guns of all the batteries around the harbor, the Confederate and the Palmetto flags were hoisted side by side, on the damaged ramparts of the fort. To Captain Hallonquist, of the 1st Artillery Regulars, with his worthy Lieutenants Rhett, Mitchel, and Blake, and to the gallant Captain Cuthbert, with his Lieutenants, Brownfield, Holmes, and Buist, was confided the keeping of Fort Sumter, under Lieutenant-Colonel Ripley as commander, and the Regulars remained there. General Beauregard w
to January, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland, to March, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland, to October, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Wilson's Cavalry Corps, Military Division Mississippi, to February, 1865. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, Wilson's Cavalry Corps, to May, 1865. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, Wilson's Cavalry Corps, and Dept. of Georgia, to September, 1865. Service. Company B was at Headquarters of Gen. Mitchel in Kentucky October to December, 1861. Action at West Liberty, Ky., October 23. Rejoined Regiment at Louisville, Ky., December, 1861. Operations near Greensburg and Lebanon, Ky., January 28-February 2, 1862. Moved to Louisville, Ky., February 14, thence to Nashville, Tenn., February 28-March 3. Advance on Columbia March 14-15. Near Columbia March 15. March to Savannah, Tenn., March 28-April 7, thence moved to Pittsburg Landing, Tenn. Advance on and siege of Corinth
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill), Some thynges of ye olden tyme. (search)
rd time050 Sent our sister Manning a leg of mutton011 Payd Mr. Palsgrave for physic for our sister Albone 026 Payd for a goat for goody Albone to goodman Prentiss 010 Payd to John Shepheard for a fower gallon bottell to bring sack for the sacrament030 Payd to Mrs. Danforth in her husband's absence, in silver, the sume of 25 shillings for wine, sugar and spice at the buriall of Mrs. Chauncy who deseaced the 24 of the 11.67150 In 1668 the second minister of the church, the matchless Mitchel died. He had succeeded to the church and the parsonage and had married the widow of his predecessor. He died in an extreme hot season and there is the record of the payment to goodman Orton of Charlestown for making a carpaluing to wrap Mr. Mitchell and for doing something to his coffing that way 4s. This wrapping was of cloth covered with tar. When the grave was opened a few years ago some remains of the shroud were found, and a quantity of tansy which had been used as a disinfectant.
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