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The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 13 1 Browse Search
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ial iron fence erected on Massachusetts Avenue, Garden Street, and the northerly boundary. This God's Acre, as it is often called, contains the dust of many of the most eminent persons in Massachusetts: the early ministers of the town, Shepard, Mitchel, Oakes, Appleton, Hilliard, and others; early presidents of Harvard College, Dunster, Chauncy, Willard; the first settlers and proprietors, Simon Stone, Deacon Gregory Stone, Roger Harlakenden, John Bridge, Stephen Daye, Elijah Corlett; and, latnsecrated ground of the Fathers. We certainly owe this, ere it is too late, to those who shall come after us. The city of Cambridge should add an honor to its semicenten-nial this year by erecting a simple monument or tablet near that of Jonathan Mitchel, in commemoration of Rev. Thomas Shepard, who died August 25, 1649. He made it possible for Cambridge to be honorably known everywhere as the University City. An eye-witness and historian of his time says, To make the whole world understan
e talking about in those days. In 1648 the Cambridge Platform was framed. In 1649 Thomas Shepard died, and in 1650 Jonathan Mitchel—the matchless Mitchel—became his successor in the church and parsonage, and married the widow, Margaret Shepard. InMitchel—became his successor in the church and parsonage, and married the widow, Margaret Shepard. In the Quinquennial Catalogue of the college, at the head of the list for 1647, stands Jonathan Mitchel, A. M.: Fellow. In that year, 1650, the second meeting-house was built on Watchhouse Hill. A very sad event in this pastorate was the declaratioJonathan Mitchel, A. M.: Fellow. In that year, 1650, the second meeting-house was built on Watchhouse Hill. A very sad event in this pastorate was the declaration of Henry Dunster, president of the college, of his new views regarding the baptism of children. This led to a bitter controversy, which ended in Dunster's resignation of his office and his removal from Cambridge. But he asked that his burial migmbridge, and so it was. By a singular error, the slab which bears the record of his virtues has been for many years over Mitchel's grave. Another incident in this pastorate was the setting off of the people of Cambridge Village, on the south side o<
401. Mayors, list of, 63. Medford, removes its powder from Charlestown, 23. Meeting-house, the first, 5, 234. Memorial Day exercises on the Common. 51. Memorial Hall, site of, 36, 37. Menotomy, becomes the Second Parish of Cambridge, 9, 14, 236. Menotomy Road (Massachusetts Avenue), 133. Methodist churches, 240. Middlesex Bank, 303. Middletown, Conn., settled, 7. Milestone in Harvard Square, 134. Milk, Inspector of, 405. Minute-men, monument to, 135. Mitchel, Rev. Jonathan, 235. Mizpah Lodge of Masons, 284. Monti Luigi, the Young Sicilian, 211. Morse, Royal, auctioneer, 40. Morse's hourly, 38. Moulson, Lady Ann, establishes scholarship at Harvard, 174; Radcliffe College named for, 175. Moulson, Sir Thomas, 174. Mount Auburn, location, 139; known as Stone's Woods, 139; also Sweet Auburn, 139; proprietors, 139; use as a cemetery authorized, 139; the tower, 139; first committee for the cemetery, 139, 140; consecration, 140; i