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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 13, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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him! and two in the crowd drew out ropes from their pockets intent upon the execution, but the strong detachment of police succeeded, with great difficulty, in his protection. For three or four hours the crowd continued to increase, until Baltimore street was filled with excited men. Occasionally a secessionist would be seen, when he would either be chased away or beaten if caught, and many a one received blows and kicks which they will long remember. About half-past 11 o'clock Captain Joseph Mitchel, of the Middle District Police Station, proceeded to the Independent Methodist Episcopal Church, at the Assembly Rooms, and had an interview with one of its officials. He described the state of affairs and advised them to suspend their services and retire, especially as many in the crowd threatened to attack the men when they left the building. The official declined doing so, and said he preferred seeing a higher officer in relation to the matter. Marshal Van Nostrand then went up
him! and two in the crowd drew out ropes from their pockets intent upon the execution, but the strong detachment of police succeeded, with great difficulty, in his protection. For three or four hours the crowd continued to increase, until Baltimore street was filled with excited men. Occasionally a secessionist would be seen, when he would either be chased away or beaten if caught, and many a one received blows and kicks which they will long remember. About half-past 11 o'clock Captain Joseph Mitchel, of the Middle District Police Station, proceeded to the Independent Methodist Episcopal Church, at the Assembly Rooms, and had an interview with one of its officials. He described the state of affairs and advised them to suspend their services and retire, especially as many in the crowd threatened to attack the men when they left the building. The official declined doing so, and said he preferred seeing a higher officer in relation to the matter. Marshal Van Nostrand then went up
ony for which the grand jury had never found an indictment. Two of his fellow-prisoners, Melvin Davenport and Charles Toothacre, testified that when the scheme for breaking out was maturing Nelson refused to aid the parties engaged, and after they had gone had to be persuaded to get out. His repugnance was based on the idea that of the grand jury did not indict him he would be discharged anyhow — After his escape he was picked up on Cary street drunk. He was acquitted by the jury. Joseph Mitchel and Pat Murphy, fined for an assault by the Court, on Thursday, paid to the Clerk the amount and costs of prosecution. John Deane emancipated by Wm. Chamberlayne, and John Marx, emancipated by Wm O George, were permitted to remain in the State on proving good characters for sobriety and honesty. John R. Aitem was fined $10 and costs for permitting his slave, Wm., Jackson, to go at large, contrary to law. Samuel Chipley, bound in a recognizance of $100 with Daniel Ratcliffe