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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 19, 1861., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 3, 1860., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: the early drama, 1756-1860 (search)
nt and his Clerks, performed in 1843, with scenery representing the Battery, Wall St., Chatham Square and the Lunatic Asylum. These plays, however, have not survived, but there can be little doubt that when F. J. Chanfrau made his great success in A Glance at New York in 1848, the public had been prepared to enjoy the type of play he furnished. The story of the building of this play is an interesting one. It was written by Benjamin A. Baker, the prompter at the Olympic Theatre, who when Mitchell, the manager, had refused to produce it, insisted on its production at his own benefit and had the satisfaction of witnessing the tumultuous reception that Chanfrau received in the part of Mose, the New York fireman. Chanfrau had made a number of imitations of firemen before on the stage, and the play was, therefore, a growth. It is melodramatic, but there is a reality about the scenes in the dives and streets that points forward rather than backward. Baker continued in New York as it is
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: fiction I — Brown, Cooper. (search)
ence of Richardson. Mrs. Morton. Mrs. Poster. Mrs. Rowson. Charlotte Temple. Hugh Henry Brackenridge. modern Chivalry. Charles Brockden Brown. Alcuin. Arthur Mervyn. Wieland. Ormond. Brown's indebtedness to Godwin. Edgar Huntly. Isaac Mitchell. Tabitha Tenney. Samuel Woodworth. James Fenimore Cooper. youth. naval career. Precaution. the spy. the pioneers. the pilot. the last of the Mohicans. the prairie. residence in Europe. red Rover. the Wept of wish-ton-wish. noti with occasional flickerings of interest, firmly fixed as a literary ancestor. There is little to note in American fiction between the close of Brown's career and the beginning of Cooper's. An absurd romance, The Asylum (1811), probably by Isaac Mitchell, was popular. Tabitha Tenny (1762-1837) produced a funny if robustious anti-romance, Female Quixotism (1808?); Samuel Woodworth See also Book II, Chaps. II and V. mingled conventional history with conventional romance in The Champions of
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
i16, 154, 158, 161, 162, 163, 165, 173, 174, 177, 181, 274 Minute philosopher, 86 Mirabeau, 91 Miscellaneous poems an Divers occasions, etc., 166 n. Miscellanies (Tudor), 240 Miscellanies (Verplanck, Bryant, and Sands), 240 Mitchell [manager of the Olympic Theatre], 229 Mitchell [manager of the Olympic Theatre], Isaac, 292 Mitchill, Samuel Latham, 237, 288 Mitford, Mary Russell, 318 Moby Dick, 322-323 Mocha Dick, 322, 322 n. Modern Chivalry, 286-287 ModesMitchell [manager of the Olympic Theatre], Isaac, 292 Mitchill, Samuel Latham, 237, 288 Mitford, Mary Russell, 318 Moby Dick, 322-323 Mocha Dick, 322, 322 n. Modern Chivalry, 286-287 Modest inquiry into the nature and necessity of paper Currency, 95 Mohammed, 224 Moll Pitcher, 224 n. Moore, Thomas, 236, 243, 248, 255, 279, 281 Monikins, the, 302 Monitor, the, 117, 120 Montaigne, 12, 109, 187, 188, 208 Monterey, 280 Montesquieu, 119 Monthly magazine, the, 291 Monument of Phaon, the, 181 Monumental memorial of a late voyage, etc., A, 9 Morals of Chess, the, 101 More, Henry, 70 n. Morris, Colonel G. P., 241, 279 Morris, William, 261 Morse, J
othing has been heard since June, 1856. Von Henglin is at the head of it. Gabriel Feretti, Great Prior of the Order of Malta, Bishop of Sabina, and Abbot of Jarva, born at Ancona, Jan. 31, 1795, died in Rome Sept. 15, 1860. Col. E. E. Ellsworth, of Zouave fame, who now resides at Springfield, Illinois, has taken the stump for the Republicans. A flirt is like a dipper attached to a hydrant; every one is at liberty to drink from it, but no one desires to carry it away. Isaac Mitchell, of Richmond, Va., was swindled out of $47 at Cincinnati on Tuesday, by the "confidence" game. John McBride, a well-known merchant of Cincinnati, died on the 31st ult. The Baptist Church at Athens, Ga., was destroyed by fire on the 28th ult. Dickens received five thousand dollars from the Harpers for his story of "Hunted Down." The Thorndike collection of pictures was sold in Boston, last week, for $12,833. J. B. Carson died at Alexandria, Va., on the 2d inst., f
the strict etiquette of courts, and recognized all American citizens as standing in truth and reality on the platform of equality which they profess to occupy. Moreover, the hotel keepers of the United States, in general, are as intelligent and every way gentlemanly a class of men as their guests, and in Albany, we should think, especially in the winter season, when the Legislature is in session, much more so. The New York Herald mentions, in connection with the case of Gov. Morgan and Gen. Mitchell, that when LordSydenham came over as Governor General, he was for some time the guest of a gentleman who kept a hotel in Toronto, and who did everything in his power to make him as comfortable as possible. After the government house had been prepared for the Governor's residence, he removed to it, and gave a dinner to the Mayor and Corporation, of which body the hotel keeper was a member. The Governor General treated his fomer landlord with marked courtesy, and always asked him to the
A cotton-seed Huller. --We went yesterday to the Muscogee Iron Works, to see the operations of a mill for hulling cotton seed, the invention of Mr. Isaac Mitchell, of this city. It was working very successfully, separating the kernel from the lint as completely as the gin separates the lint and seed. The machine is a very higher. The chief difficulty in the way of making oil from cotton seed is that of separating the kernel from the hull by a cheap process, and this, we think, Mr. Mitchell has accomplished. This is a subject of immense advantage to the South, as the success of this enterprise will add greatly to the value of the cotton crop,ll yield fully two gallons of oil. Cotton seed oil has for some time been manufactured in New Orleans, but we understand that the hulling is there done by machinery so expensive as to forbid its use on plantations. Mr. Mitchell's invention is cheap and simple. We learn that he has applied for a patent.--Columbus Enquirer.