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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 16 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 15 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Aguinaldo, Emilio, 1870- (search)
ies. As soon as his hiding-place was known, General Funston planned the scheme for his capture. He chose a number of native troops, informing them that they were to pass themselves off as Aguinaldo's expected reinforcements. Four Tagalogs who had been officers in the insurgent army were first selected, and then seventy-eight trustworthy Maccabebe scouts were picked out. Besides General Funston this expedition was accompanied by Captain Hazzard, of the 1st United States Cavalry, and Lieutenant Mitchell and Captain Newton, of the 34th Infantry. On March 6, at 4 P. M., the expedition embarked on the gunboat Vicksburg at Cavite. At 2 A. M. on the 14th General Funston and his party were landed within a short distance of Baler, about 20 miles south of Casiguran, the place nearest the reported headquarters of Aguinaldo. suitable for a base of operations. As the Vicksburg had displayed no lights and had used extreme precaution, not the slightest suspicion was excited by the landing. A
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chickamauga, battle of (search)
of Thomas with Steedman's division. The latter fought his way to the crest of a hill, and then turning his artillery upon his assailants, drove them down the southern slope of the ridge with great slaughter. They returned to the attack with an overwhelming force, determined to drive the Nationals from the ridge, and pressed Thomas most severely. Finally, when they were moving along a ridge and in a gorge, to assail his right flank and rear, Granger formed two brigades (Whittaker's and Mitchell's) into a charging party, and hurled them against the Confederates led by Hindman. Steedman led the charging party, with a regimental flag in his hand, and soon won a victory. In the space of twenty minutes the Confederates disappeared, and the Nationals held both the ridge and gorge. Very soon a greater portion of the Confederate army were swarming around the foot of the ridge, on which stood Thomas with the remnant of seven divisions of the Army of the Cumberland. The Confederates w
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mitchell, Maria 1818-1869 (search)
Mitchell, Maria 1818-1869 Astronomer; born in Nantucket, Mass., Aug. 1, 1818; inherited from her father, William Mitchell (who died in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., in April, 1869), a fondness for astronomical studies and became a valuable assistant to him in the study of astronomy when she was quite young. Examining nebulae and searching for comets, her industry and efforts were rewarded when, on Oct. 1, 1847, she discovered a telescopic comet, for which she received a gold medal from the King of Denmark. She was afterwards employed in making observations connected with the United States coast survey, and for many years assisted in the compilation of the Nautical almanac. In the spring of 1865 she was appointed Professor of Astronomy and superintendent of the observatory at Vassar College, and entered upon her duties in September. She resigned in 1888. Professor Mitchell was a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, being the first woman admitted to that b
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
d elsewhere......April 29–May 1, 1889 Body of Dr. Cronin, of Chicago, who had disappeared three weeks previously, found in a sewer......May 22, 1889 Johnstown flood......May 31, 1889 John Brown's fort, near Harper's Ferry, swept away by a flood on the Potomac......June, 1889 City of Seattle, W. T., nearly destroyed by fire; 30 acres burned over; loss, $5,000,000......June 6, 1889 Simon Cameron, statesman, born 1799, dies at Donegal, Lancaster co., Pa.......June 26, 1889 Maria Mitchell, astronomer, born 1818, dies at Lynn, Mass.......June 28, 1889 Theodore Dwight Woolsey, ex-president of Yale College, born 1801, dies at New Haven, Conn.......July 1, 1889 Sioux reservation in Dakota (11,000,000 acres) ceded to the United States......Aug. 6, 1889 David S. Terry, assaulting Judge Stephen Field at Lathrop, Cal., is shot dead by United States Marshal Nagle......Aug. 14, 1889 Cronin murder trial begins in Chicago......Aug. 30, 1889 Deep Harbor Convention, wi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts (search)
Fitchburg Railroad Company......1887 First Monday in September (Labor Day) made a legal holiday at session of legislature, which adjourns......June 16, 1887 Spencer F. Baird, naturalist, born 1823; dies at Wood's Holl......Aug. 19, 1887 Asa Gray, botanist, born 1810, dies at Cambridge......Jan. 30, 1888 Ballot law modelled on the Australian system adopted by legislature at session ending......May 29, 1888 Gen. P. H. Sheridan, born 1831, dies at Nonquit......Aug. 5, 1888 Maria Mitchell, astronomer, born 1818, dies at Lynn......June 28, 1889 Maritime exhibition opens at Boston......Nov. 4, 1889 Great fire at Lynn; 296 buildings destroyed; 80 acres burned over; loss, $5,000,000......Nov. 26, 1889 Haverhill celebrates its 250th anniversary......July 2, 1890 Cyclone visits the suburbs of South Lawrence, the most severe ever recorded in the New England States; over $100,000 worth of property destroyed......July 26, 1890 John Boyle O'Reilly, Irish patriot, bor
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), South Dakota, State of (search)
outhern half of the Territory......Sept. 19, 1883 University of South Dakota at Vermilion opened......1883 Pierre University at East Pierre chartered and opened......1883 Sioux Falls University opened......1883 United States Senate passes a bill for the admission as a State of the southern half of Dakota Territory; that portion north of the 46th parallel to be called the Territory of Lincoln......1884 Agricultural college at Brookings opened......1884 Dakota University at Mitchell opened......September, 1885 Constitutional convention called by the legislature at Sioux Falls frames a constitution for South Dakota......Sept. 25, 1885 Legislature passes a local option law......1887 School of mines at Rapid City, established by act of legislature in 1885, is opened......1887 A majority vote for the division of Dakota Territory into two States, North and South Dakota, at an election held......November, 1887 Act admitting South Dakota signed, a constitutiona
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wisconsin, (search)
Corner-stone of capital at Madison laid......July 4, 1837 Governor Dodge, of Wisconsin Territory, by treaty with the Ojibways at Fort Snelling, obtains cession to the United States of the pine forests of the valley of the St. Croix and its tributaries......July 29, 1837 Assembly meets at Burlington, Des Moines county......Nov. 6, 1837 Legislature assembles at Madison......Nov. 26, 1838 Portage canal, connecting Wisconsin and Fox rivers, begun by the United States......1838 Mitchell's bank at Milwaukee established......1839 The Wisconsin phalanx, a community on Fourier's system, established at Ceresco, now Ripon......May, 1844 Mormon colony, an offshoot from Nauvoo, led by James Jesse Strang, is founded on White River at Voree......1845 Enabling act for the State of Wisconsin passed by Congress......Aug. 6, 1846 State constitution prohibiting banks and banking, framed by a convention at Madison, Oct. 5–Dec. 16, 1846, is rejected by the people......April, 18
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 16: the last of Green Peace 1872-1876; aet. 53-57 (search)
ertised, not one line of it writtensubject, Men's Women and Women's Women. Set to work at once, almost overpowered by the task, and the shortness of the time. The lecture was finished in the morning, delivered in the afternoon. Warm congratulations at the close.... Such a sense of relief! On December 19 she notes the departure of dear Flossy and her dearest little Boy .... House very desolate without them. This boy is especially dear to Doctor Howe and myself. December 28. Maria Mitchell's Club lecture to-day was beautiful exceedingly. I might have envied her the steady grasp and unbroken advance of scientific study, did I not feel sure that God gives to each his own work. Mine, such as it is, would be helped and beautified by the knowledge which she imparts so easily, but perhaps all of her that I shall remember and try to follow is her spirit. Her silver hair seems lustrous with spiritual brightness, as do her dark eyes. Her movements are full of womanly grace, not
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 17: the woman's cause 1868-1910 (search)
f that year. She says of this call:-- Many names, some known, others unknown to me, were appended to the document first sent forth. My own was asked for. Should I give or withhold it? Among the signatures already obtained, I saw that of Maria Mitchell, She had a great regard and admiration for Miss Mitchell. Scientific achievement seemed to her well-nigh miraculous, and roused in her an almost childlike reverence. and this determined me to give my own. She went to the Congress, and Miss Mitchell. Scientific achievement seemed to her well-nigh miraculous, and roused in her an almost childlike reverence. and this determined me to give my own. She went to the Congress, and viewed its proceedings a little critically at first, its plan appearing to her rather vast and vague. Yet she felt the idea of the Association to be a good one; and when it was formed, with the above title, and with Mrs. Livermore as president, she was glad to serve on a sub-committee, charged with selecting topics and speakers for the first annual Congress. The object of the Association was to consider and present practical methods for securing to women higher intellectual, moral, and ph
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4:
241 Beacon Street
: the New Orleans Exposition 1883-1885; aet. 64-66 (search)
some poems, to wit, all of the Egyptian ones, and the poem on the Vestal dug up in Rome. At bedtime last night I had a thought of ghosts. I spoke of this to Maria Mitchell to-day. She told me that Mr. Matthew Vassar's body had been laid in this room and those of various persons since, which, had I known, I had been less comfort of things. Long silence b'tween us. Growing estrangement, eh? Richardses are better, eh? Which nobody can deny.... Have been hard at work upon a memoir of Maria Mitchell, which is well-nigh finished.... Am spleeny to-day: the weather being according.... To Uncle Sam March 28, 1883. My darling brother, I owe you two good in all of which I take delight, while yet to quote St. Paul, The good that I would I do not. To give you a few items, I have just finished a short memoir of Maria Mitchell, Professor of Astronomy at Vassar College. This was an interesting task, but had to be very carefully done. At the same time, I had to correct Maud's memoir
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