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istian Indians, yet the clamors and animosity among the common people increased daily, not only against those Indians, but also against all such English as were judged to be charitable to them, and particularly, many harsh reflections and speeches were uttered against Major Daniel Gookin and Mr. John Eliot. Coll. Amer. Ant. Soc., II. 452, 453. As a specimen of the popular clamors and animosity, I copy a few manuscripts:— Elizabeth Belcher, aged 57, Martha Remington aged 31, and Mary Mitchell, aged 20, being sworne, doe say, that on ye 28th day of Febr. last, abt 10 of the clocke at night, Ri: Scott came into ye house of ye said Belcher, and suddenly after he came in broak out into many hideous raileing expressions agt ye worll Capt. Daniel Gookin, calling him an Irish dog yt was never faithful to his country, the sonne of a whoare, a bitch, a rogue, God confound him, & God rott his soul, saying if I could meet him alone I would pistoll him. I wish my knife and sizers were in
free as soon as he should recover from his sickness, and in the meantime to be carefully provided for; one in four years, and the third, who was young, in seven years. Each of his slaves was to receive a legacy of ten pounds on the day of his freedom. A legacy of three pounds was bestowed on a former slave. After the death of his wife, who was to have a life-estate in his property, he bequeathed his estate to his cousins, John Howard, Nathaniel Howard, Joseph Howard, Elisha Howard, and Mary Mitchell, all of Bridgewater,--with the special provision that Joseph Howard should have twenty pounds more than either of the other legatees, if he would make his slave, Stephen, free; otherwise he should have no part of the real estate, which was appraised at £ 307. This provision was probably complied with; for the heirs of Joseph, having acquired the rights of the other legatees, sold the real estate 8 Mar. 1723-4 to John Bradish. Trowbridge, James, son of Thomas, was born at Dorchester ab
free as soon as he should recover from his sickness, and in the meantime to be carefully provided for; one in four years, and the third, who was young, in seven years. Each of his slaves was to receive a legacy of ten pounds on the day of his freedom. A legacy of three pounds was bestowed on a former slave. After the death of his wife, who was to have a life-estate in his property, he bequeathed his estate to his cousins, John Howard, Nathaniel Howard, Joseph Howard, Elisha Howard, and Mary Mitchell, all of Bridgewater,--with the special provision that Joseph Howard should have twenty pounds more than either of the other legatees, if he would make his slave, Stephen, free; otherwise he should have no part of the real estate, which was appraised at £ 307. This provision was probably complied with; for the heirs of Joseph, having acquired the rights of the other legatees, sold the real estate 8 Mar. 1723-4 to John Bradish. Trowbridge, James, son of Thomas, was born at Dorchester ab
Thus far the appearance of this city indicates that a large majority of the citizens will observe the day, if not by praying and offering up thanksgiving sermons and hymns, by feasting on roast fowl and its accompaniments. The managers of the Opera House, Messrs. S. W. Glenn and James A. Cates, also offer additional at tractions to their house, and are in a fair way to be remunerated for their exertions. The bill for to night's performance embraces "The Dream at Sea," in which Miss Mary Mitchell sustains the character of Anne Trevanion, and Launce Lynwood is to be represented by Mr. S. E. Browne, the able stage manager. Other novelties finish the bill. Market supplies are abundant, and sell at reasonable rates. Wood and coal are rather scarce articles and are held at high rates. The products of the country, with the exception of market truck, do not find their way to this city, as purchasers are not allowed to export the same. Hence the farmers can find no object in g
Mayor's Court. --A few minutes of the Mayor's attention yesterday was occupied in the disposition of the following cases: Three white females, named Virginia Wade, Mary Mitchell and Mary J. Myers, were charged with unlawfully destroying a part of a dwelling-house occupied by them, the property of Mary Lyons. The parties have been living for some time in an old brick tenement on Main street, at the corner of Twentieth, and two of them — namely, Virginia Wade and Mary Myers — being of very bad character and too lazy to work, have supplied themselves with firewood by tearing down the banisters, ripping out window-frames, and otherwise mutilating the house. The warrant against Mrs. Mitchell was withdrawn, it having been proven that she was orderly and respectable, and that she had no intercourse with the others. Wade and Myers were committed to jail in default of security for their good behavior. Peter, slave of James D. Coleman, was charged with stealing one clock, tw