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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 7 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
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330.— Letters to G., 1.330; from G., 1.331, 332, 338, 342. Mississippi, doctors and gamblers hung, 1.485, 501. Missouri, admission as a slave State, 1.88, 2.106; compromise, 1.90, 92, 2.80, 106; refuses State aid to colonization, 1.148. Mitchell, Charles [d. 1831], counsel for G., 1.68, plea, 170, motion in arrest of judgment, 171. Mitchell, Stephen, 1.68. Monroe, James [1758-1831], pro-slavery action, 1.154, father-in-law of S. L. Gouverneur, 493. Montgomery, James [1771-1854], Mitchell, Stephen, 1.68. Monroe, James [1758-1831], pro-slavery action, 1.154, father-in-law of S. L. Gouverneur, 493. Montgomery, James [1771-1854], 2.395. Monthly Offering, 2.284. Moore, E. N., witnesses Boston mob, 2.1, 17, 21, 25, 26, describes Homer's end, 35. Moore, Esther [d. Philadelphia, Nov. 21, 1854, in 80th year], at founding of Am. A. S. S., 1.398; speaks at Penn. Hall, 2.215. Moore, John [1788-1867], 1.251. Moore, Mark, 2.383. Moral Reform, 2.326, 409. Morgan, William, abducted by Masons in 1826, 1.113. Morpeth, Lord [1802-1864], at Wilberforce's funeral, 1.379, at S. Gurney's place, 2.385, 387, kindness
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 6: the genius of Universal emancipation.1829-30. (search)
e benevolence of his heart was as expansive as the ocean. Mr. Mitchell was a native of Connecticut, and a son of Judge Stephen Mitchell of that State (Lib. 1.111). The counsel for the prosecution, finding that the extracts from the libellous artvidence, having proved the shipment of slaves on the Francis, and Mr. Todd's ownership of the vessel being admitted. Mr. Mitchell made an eloquent plea in behalf of his client, addressing the jury for nearly two hours. Indignation and shame for thedant by surprise, by giving him no notice to prepare his evidence of the truth of those parts omitted. In concluding, Mr. Mitchell paid a warm tribute to the editors of the Genius, and expressed the hope that they would be sustained by the jury and e jury only fifteen minutes to return a verdict in favor of the prosecution, and to declare Garrison guilty of libel. Mr. Mitchell at once moved for arrest of judgment, and for judgment of acquittal; but these motions, as well as one for a new trial