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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 2 2 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 1 1 Browse Search
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 3: Holmes (search)
ical School in 1836, became Professor at Dartmouth in 1838, and Professor at the Harvard Medical School in 1847. He was thus away from Cambridge during most of my boyhood, and my memory first depicts him vividly when he came back to give his Phi Beta Kappa poem in 1836. He was at this time a young physician of great promise, which was thought to be rather impaired by his amusing himself with poetry. So at least, he always thought; and he cautioned in later years a younger physician, Dr. Weir Mitchell, to avoid the fault which he had committed, advising him to be known exclusively as a physician until his reputation in that line should be made. The effect of levity conveyed by this poem — which was in the main a serious, not to say a ponderous, one--was due largely to certain passages which he described as wanting in dignity and only partly reprinted in an appendix. Especially criticised was one passage in which he gallantly enumerated the probable names of the various young ladi
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Index (search)
80; foreign minister, 181-182; his nephews, 183-184; compared with Holmes, 185-186; fertility of mind, 187-188; prose writings, 189-190; popularity in London, 191-192; later life, 193-195; death, 196. Lowell, Mrs. J. R. (Maria White), 159, 162, 176. Lowell, Percival, 94. Lowell, Rev. R. T. S., 16. Lowell, Miss, Sally, 125. Macaulay, T. B., 88. Mackenzie, Lieut. A. S., 117. Mather, Cotton, 4, 7. Mather, Pres., Increase, 7. Mather, Rev., Richard, 7. Milton, John, 90, 189. Mitchell, Dr., Weir, 82. Moore, Thomas, 91. Morse, J. T., Jr., 92, 100. Morton, Thomas, 29. Motley, J. L., 63, 68, 71, 83, 191. Newell, W. W., 150. Norton, Andrews, 14, 44, 48, 49. Norton, Prof. C. E., 16, 28, 37,44, 148, 160, 172. Nuttall, Thomas, 13. Oakes, Pres., Urian, 7. Oliver, Mrs., 151. Oliver, Lieut. Gov., 153. Oliver, Lieut., Thomas, 150, 151, 152. Page, W. H., 69. Palfrey, Rev. J. G., 16, 44, 50. Palfrey, Miss Sarah H., 16. Parker, Rev., Theodore, 53, 58, 62, 63, 67, 104,
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 6: the Cambridge group (search)
al School in 1836, became Professor at Dartmouth in 1838, and Professor at the Harvard Medical School in 1847. He was thus away from Cambridge during most of my boyhood, and my memory first depicts him vividly when he came back to give his Phi Beta Kappa poem in 1836. He was at this time a young physician of great promise, which was thought to be rather impaired by his amusing himself with poetry. So, at least, he always thought; and he cautioned in later years a younger physician, Dr. Weir Mitchell, to avoid the fault which he had admitted, advising him to be known exclusively as a physician until his reputation in that line should be made. The effect of levity conveyed by this poem — which was in the main a serious, not to say a ponderous one--was due largely to certain passages which he described as wanting in dignity. Especially criticised was one passage in which he gallantly enumerated the probable names of the various young ladies in the gallery, mentioning, for instance,
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 23: writers of familiar verse (search)
lightness and brightness. Three other American poets of high ambition, Stedman, See Book III, Chap. X. Aldrich, Ibid. and Bret Harte, See Book III, Chaps. V. and VI. gave a more abundant share of their attention to the poetry which is blithe and buoyant; and in any selection of the best in this kind, it would be inexcusable to omit Stedman's Pan in wall Street, Aldrich's In an Atelier, or Bret Harte's Her letter. Nor would any competent editor exclude from such a collection Weir Mitchell's Decanter of Madeira, George Arnold's Jolly old pedagogue, or Charles Henry Webb's Dum Vivimus Vivamus. Nor would it be difficult largely to increase this list of examples chosen from the verse of men whose reputation has been won mainly in other fields. Three of our lighter lyrists demand a little more detailed consideration,—John Godfrey Saxe (1816-87), Eugene Field See also Book III, Chap. IX. (1850-95), and Henry Cuyler Bunner See also Book III, Chap. VI. (1855-96), thou
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: poets of the Civil War I (search)
the duel between the Merrimac and the Cumberland stirred the poets as did almost no other episode of the entire war. Thomas Buchanan Read wrote The attack; Longfellow, The Cumberland; Boker, On Board the Cumberland; Melville, The Cumberland; Weir Mitchell, How the Cumberland went down,—all of them poems which, with a larger eloquence than then appeared, sounded the knell of the wooden battleship. As might have been expected, defeat had more poets than victory; Boker, however, wrote The Cruiseetry it is inferior. Henry Clay Work's The year of Jubilee, supposed to be written by a slave full of delight in the coming freedom, is too amusing and racy to need to have its poetical merits estimated. Read's The Eagle and the Vulture and Weir Mitchell's Kearsarge echoed the doom of the Alabama. Farragut was so fortunate as to have two poets among his officers at Mobile Bay: William Tuckey Meredith, who wrote Farragut—— Farragut, Farragut, Old Heart of Oak, Daring Dave Farragut, Thunde<
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: Newport 1879-1882; aet. 60-63 (search)
ond ornament. The philosopher [we think it was Emerson] said, A violet is more beautiful. I cannot forget the disgust expressed in the jeweller's face at this remark. She then outlined the course laid out by the Friends in Council, lectures on astronomy, botany, natural history, all by eminent persons. They would not expect the Club to meet them on their own ground. They would come to that of their hearers, and would unfold to them what they were able to understand. Accordingly, Weir Mitchell discoursed to them on the Poison of Serpents, John La Farge on the South Sea Islands, Alexander Agassiz on Deep-Sea Dredging and the Panama Canal; while Mark Twain and Hans Breitmann made merry, each in his own inimitable fashion. The Town and Country Club had a long and happy career. No matter what heavy work she might have on hand for the summer, no sooner arrived at Newport than our mother called together her Governing Committee and planned out the season's meetings. It may have
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 18: certain clubs (search)
lace once in ten days. At each meeting a lecture was given on some topic of history, science, or general literature. Tea and conversation followed, and the party usually broke up after a session of two hours. Colonel Higginson once deigned to say that this club made it possible to be sensible even at Newport and during the summer. The names of a few persons show what we aimed at, and how far we succeeded. We had scientific lectures from Professor Rogers, Professor Alexander Agassiz, Dr. Weir Mitchell, and others. Maria Mitchell, professor of astronomy at Vassar College, gave us a lecture on Saturn. Miss Kate Hillard spoke to us several times. Professor Thomas Davidson unfolded for us the philosophy of Aristotle. Rev. George E. Ellis gave us a lecture on the Indians of Rhode Island, and another on Bishop Berkeley. Professor Bailey of Providence spoke on insectivorous plants, and on one occasion we enjoyed in his company a club picnic at Paradise, after which the wild flowers in
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Index (search)
hant Princes of Wall Street, The, inaccuracy of, 52. Merritt, Mrs., a New Orleans lady, addresses the colored people, 398. Metastasio, dramas of, read, 57, 206. Milan, the Howes in, 119, 120. Milnes, Richard Monckton. See Houghton, Lord. Milton, John, his Paradise Lost used as a text-book, 58. Mitchell, Maria, her character and attainments: signs the call for a congress of women, 385; becomes the president in 1876, 387; lectures to the Town and Country Club, 406. Mitchell, Dr., Weir, lectures to the Town and Country Club, 406. Moliere, his comedies read, 206. Monza, trip to, 119. Moore, Prof., at Columbia College, 23. Moral Philosophy, William Paley's, 13. Morecchini, Monsignore, minister of public charities at Rome, 124. Morpeth, George, Lord (afterwards seventh earl of Carlisle), at Lansdowne House, 102, 103; Sydney Smith's dream about, 107; takes the Howes to Pentonville prison, 109. Motley, John Lothrop, at school with Tom Appleton, 433.