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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 65 11 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 64 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 56 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 3 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 11 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 4 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 3 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for John G. Mitchell or search for John G. Mitchell in all documents.

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of the Fourteenth corps by General Morgan and Colonels McCook and Mitchell. The principal skirmishing was performed by McCook's brigade, whi It is determined finally to storm the hills in front, and Colonel John G. Mitchell, commanding brigade in General Davis' division, is to havethe ascent as I did, the well done would have hailed the flag that Mitchell's gallant fellows planted on the rebel parapet that day. While he enemy opened a fierce fire; the splendid achievement of Colonel John G. Mitchell, in driving the rebels from the mouth of Buzzard Roost Gapthe friendly night came on, when they quietly withdrew. Colonel John G. Mitchell's brigade, of Davis' division, was now sent to the assistacame gallantly into the fight, as does any body of troops with Colonel Mitchell for a leader. But the relentless storm from the enemy's workson in silencing batteries engaged in enfilading Judah and Newton. Mitchell's brigade, of Davis' division, got into a similar position and pic
ls Sherman and Thomas were early on Tunnel Hill, and to-night have their headquarters within a mile of our advance line. Both Generals watched every movement of the enemy, and gave their orders with a coolness and confidence that proved them to be equal for any emergency that may arise. The brigades in Stanley's division of the Fourth corps engaged, were commanded by Generals Whitaker and Cruft, and Colonel Gross, and those of the Fourteenth corps by General Morgan and Colonels McCook and Mitchell. The principal skirmishing was performed by McCook's brigade, which lost no men. Our line to-night is about one mile south of Tunnel Hill, and within three miles of the celebrated Buzzard Roost, near which the Fourteenth corps had the spirited engagement on the twenty-sixth and twenty-seventh of February last. Our line extends from Rocky Face Ridge to (report says) the left of General Hooker, who has come up on the enemy's left flank. A large force of cavalry is under General Kilpatr
er-General Cruft to reconnoitre the enemy's position. This reconnoisance (made by a brigade under the command of Colonel J. G. Mitchell), owing to the whole surface of the country being covered with ice, rendering it almost impossible for men or anithe Murfreesboro and Nolensville turnpikes, promptly pushed forward a brigade of his troops under the command of Colonel John G. Mitchell, and occupied Riddle's Hill, protecting our rear against any attempt of the enemy to use his cavalry to annoy usorarily made, to wit: command. commanding officer. officers. men. aggregate. total. Fourteenth Army Corps. Colonel J. G. Mitchell, commanding.         First Battalion Lieutenant-Colonel F. W. Lister 8 526 534   Second Battalion Lieutenaneceived, directing a reconnoissance in force upon the enemy, occupying our old line of works, near Raine's house. Colonel J. G. Mitchell, commanding the brigade of detachments from the Fourteenth army corps, was assigned to that duty. He moved his b
December 11. In compliance with the order of Major-General Thomas, I directed Brigadier-General Cruft to reconnoitre the enemy's position. This reconnoisance (made by a brigade under the command of Colonel J. G. Mitchell), owing to the whole surface of the country being covered with ice, rendering it almost impossible for men or animals to move over uneven ground, and on account of the steep slopes to be ascended in approaching the position of the enemy, was a difficult duty; but it was accomplished, and the position of the enemy developed.
eft of the Fourth corps, commanded by Brigadier-General T. J. Wood, my right resting on the railroad, my left reposing near the Nolensville pike, and covering the entire left of our line, engaging and putting to flight a portion of the enemy's cavalry. General Cruft, as I advanced with the troops under my immediate command, uncovering the approaches to the city by way of the Murfreesboro and Nolensville turnpikes, promptly pushed forward a brigade of his troops under the command of Colonel John G. Mitchell, and occupied Riddle's Hill, protecting our rear against any attempt of the enemy to use his cavalry to annoy us, or interfere with our ammunition or ambulance trains. At one o'clock P. M., in obedience to an order from Major-General Thomas, my command formed a junction with the command of General Wood, and my troops united with General Wood's in assaulting the enemy, who was strongly posted and fortified on Overton's Hill. In this assault, although unsuccessful, the troops enga
n, Fourteenth army corps, was seriously wounded while superintending a fatigue party at the dam, and the services of this meritorious officer were thereby lost to his command during the residue of the campaign. The following statement exhibits the number of officers and men comprising the command, on leaving Chattanooga, and the formation of battalions and brigades temporarily made, to wit: command. commanding officer. officers. men. aggregate. total. Fourteenth Army Corps. Colonel J. G. Mitchell, commanding.         First Battalion Lieutenant-Colonel F. W. Lister 8 526 534   Second Battalion Lieutenant-Colonel William O'Brien 4 256 260 794 Twentieth Army Corps. Colonel Benjamin Harrison, commanding.         First Battalion Lieutenant-Colonel McManis 8 399 407   Second Battalion Major Haskins 6 304 310 717   Lieutenant-Colonel Banning, commanding.         Eighteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry Captain Henderson 9 316 325   Third Battery, Fourteent
housand three hundred and twenty-seven enlisted men, which were properly armed and distributed to their respective battalions and brigades. The Sixty-eighth Indiana volunteers (Lieutenant-Colonel Espy, commanding) was also added. These reinforcements brought the effective strength of the division up to five thousand two hundred and forty-nine. This day orders were received, directing a reconnoissance in force upon the enemy, occupying our old line of works, near Raine's house. Colonel J. G. Mitchell, commanding the brigade of detachments from the Fourteenth army corps, was assigned to that duty. He moved his brigade on the Murfreesboro turnpike, for about one-half mile, then made a detour to the right, where he formed his lines behind a small ridge, and sent his skirmishers to the front, drove in the skirmishers of the enemy, advanced upon his works, and thoroughly reconnoitered his position. The casualties of Colonel Mitchell's command were trifling, having none killed and bu
Meanwhile the veteran regiments of McCook and Mitchell never faltered, but under a very destructive the head of their brigades the loud voices of Mitchell and McCook were heard above the din of battleworks with brave and reckless traitors, stood Mitchell's boys, and gave the rebels bullet for bullet the left, formed in column of regiments, and Mitchell in the same order on the right, he uncovers hed command. Again and again did Dilworth and Mitchell lead their men to the enemy's works. Among tdred and Twenty-first Ohio, a regiment of Colonel Mitchell's brigade. He apparently ignored his own Ohio, the regiment that led the column under Mitchell, lost ten officers out of nineteen. Two mefoeman at our line. The bodies of two of Colonel Mitchell's men could be seen, after our withdrawal hundred and fifty men. Colonels Dilworth and Mitchell headed their brigades with the wisdom and dex; third, Colonel Simmes' brigade; fourth, Colonel Mitchell's Ohio brigade, three companies of the Ni[9 more...]
into the river. A short skirmish here ensued, the enemy retreating precipitately, leaving the telegraph road, turning to the right, and taking the Beaver Dam road. They were closely followed and overtaken, late in the evening, on Mr. Wynne's farm, where they were so closely pressed that they gave battle. A few gallant charges soon sent them adrift down the road, leaving several killed and wounded and several prisoners in our hands. They made another stand about two miles further on, at Mitchell's shop, and were again routed and pursued closely to Swann's farm, where their rear was strongly reinforced, and where a hot fight was joined. The brave Virginians delved into their heavy columns with such vigor and spirit that that field was soon cleared, leaving many dead and wounded. Our loss was comparatively small in these engagements, mostly in wounded. Here night closed on the parties, Fitz Lee still following and harassing their rear till the enemy reached North Anna river, when,
ng his men, and setting them a brilliant example of coolness and courage. Colonel Eggleston led his men also with great determination and bravery, both on this occasion and in the attack on Columbus. To the officers of the brigade staff, Lieutenants Mitchell, Yeoman, McKee, and Dryden, I am greatly indebted for their untiring exertions. In the fight at Ebenezer Church they were particularly active in urging forward and leading the men. In conclusion I am proud to say that the discipline an Gallant conduct with his Company (L) at Ebenezer Church. Garrard Colonel 7th Ohio V. C. Brig.-Gen'l N. J. Alexander B. B. Eggleston Colonel 1st Ohio V. C. Brig.-Gen'l N. J. Alexander Recommended for promotion by brevet by General Alexander. Mitchell Lieutenant   Brig.-Gen'l N. J. Alexander Second Brigade Staff. J. N. O. Yeoman Lieutenant   Brig.-Gen'l N. J. Alexander Recommended for promotion by brevet by General Alexander. McKee Lieutenant   Brig.-Gen'l N. J. Alexander Second Brigade Sta