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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 74 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 61 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 42 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 30 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 8 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 5 1 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for John K. Mitchell or search for John K. Mitchell in all documents.

Your search returned 25 results in 5 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 18: capture of forts Jackson and St. Philip, and the surrender of New Orleans. (search)
ana, was gathered under the command of Com. John K. Mitchell, of the Confederate Navy. This fleey-two pounder rifled guns. According to Commander Mitchell the above, being converted vessels, were numerous fire-rafts that were placed at Commander Mitchell's disposal for the purpose of lighting t Admiral) David D. Porter. naval forces (Commander Mitchell) had, in fact, set the military at defiaty of a possibly fatal explosion. Commander John K. Mitchell. (Commander of the Confederate navals still shown on the river, however, for Commander Mitchell, after setting fire to the Louisiana, trers Steering directly for the vessel carrying Mitchell's flag, the Harriet Lane sent a shot at the feamer to take possession. He was met by Commander Mitchell, and requested to extend the same terms n granted the officers and men of the forts. Mitchell was given to understand that no terms would b In a communication made to Commander Porter, Mitchell at once removed the responsibility for the ac[3 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 19: battle of the forts and capture of New Orleans. (search)
Boggs, De camp, Alden, Nichols, Caldwell, Porter, Mitchell, and others. official letters of Gideon Welles, Meamers remaining were under the command of Commander J. K. Mitchell. The officer of the fort acknowledged no servant, J. K. Duncan. Brigadier-General. Captain J. K. Mitchell, Commanding Naval Forces, Lower Mississippiance, the latter of which was sunk by order of John K. Mitchell, late commander in the United States Navy. Byn of the fort, the vessels under the command of J. K. Mitchell, with the exception of one, having no colors uprts were blown up. Enclosed is a letter from J. K. Mitchell stating that the persons mentioned therein had e Navy. List of Confederate officers: Captain J. K. Mitchell, 1st-Lieutenant J. N. Wilkinson, 2d-Lieuten be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, John K. Mitchell, Commander, Late in command of the C. States Ns Burton, Landes, and Defiance, under late Commander J. K. Mitchell, consisting of two hundred and fifty of th
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
ot stay to be captured, and it certainly was not the best method of gaining the confidence of the citizens, whom the Army and Navy claimed to protect. The amenities of war were entirely forgotten on this occasion, and such wantonness could only insure retaliation on the first favorable opportunity. On the morning of June 4th, an expedition of 400 soldiers embarked at Yorktown on board the United States steamers Commodore Morris (Lieutenant-Commander Gillis), Commodore Jones (Lieutenant-Commander Mitchell), the army gun-boat Smith Briggs and the transport Winnissimmet. These vessels proceeded to Walkertown, about twenty miles above West Point, on the Mattapony River. Here the troops were landed and marched to Aylett's, where the object of the expedition was successfully accomplished: a large foundry, with all its machinery, grist mills, and a quantity of grain were destroyed, and a number of horses captured. The affair was carried through without any accident, the gun-boats
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
past the obstructions while the Federal naval force maintained its position; but, in case it should be driven away, then the Confederates could have blown up the obstruction, passed through and broken up the pontoon bridge, thus cutting off the Army on the left bank of the James from its supports, and threatening City Point, where all the stores were gathered for the use of the Army before Richmond. The Confederate naval force at that time in the James River, under the command of Commodore J. K. Mitchell, consisted of the iron-clad Virginia (4 Brooke rifles), Captain Dunnington; iron-clad Richmond (4 Brooke rifles), Captain Johnson; iron-clad Fredericksburg (4 Brooke rifles), Captain Wilson; Nansemond, wooden (2 guns), Captain Butt; Roanoke, wooden (1 gun), Captain Wyatt, and Torpedo, wooden (1 gun), commanding officer unknown. This fleet, with its iron-clads and rifle-guns, was no match for the Onondaga and the gun-boats, assisted by the torpedo-boat; but the Confederate commander
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 54: capture of Richmond.--the destruction of the Confederate fleet in the James River, etc. (search)
attox the work of the North Atlantic Squadron was over, for all the James River region was in the hands of the Federals. Up to that time the squadron in Trent's Reach was quietly holding the Confederate iron-clads, under the command of Raphael Semmes-recently created Rear-Admiral--above Drury's Bluff, where they were quite harmless and would either have to be blown up or surrendered. Admiral Semmes assumed command of the James River fleet on the 18th of February, 1865, relieving Commodore J. K. Mitchell. The fleet as reorganized comprised the following named vessels: Virginia (iron-clad), flag-ship, four guns, Captain Dunnington; Richmond (iron-clad), four guns, Captain J. D. Johnson; son; Fredericksburg (iron-clad), four guns, Captain Glasse; Hampton (wooden), two guns, Captain Wilson (late of the Alabama); Nansemond (wooden), two guns, Captain W. K. Butt; Roanoke (wooden) two guns, Captain Polloc; Beaufort (wooden), two guns, Captain Wyatt; Torpedo (wooden), one gun, Captain