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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 18 0 Browse Search
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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), I. First months (search)
r battles; and here and there, you come on a little ridge of earth, marked by a bit of board, on which is scrawled the name of the soldier, who lies where he fell, in this desert region. Our people are very different from the Europeans in their care for the dead, and mark each grave with its name; even in the heat of battle. Headquarters Army of Potomac November 15, 1863 Yesterday the General made a start at six A. M. for Washington, taking with him Major Biddle, Captain Meade, and Captain Mitchell, and suppose he will perhaps get back to-morrow. A little before one o'clock came a telegraph that four officers of the Ghords were coming in the train, and that we were to send an officer, with ten men, also four led horses, to bring them up. So Major Barstow asked if I would go, whereat, there being nothing to do, I said I would. It is about eight miles to Bealton, the nearest place the railroad runs to, and, by making haste a little, we got there by two o'clock, and the train came
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 3 (search)
ten mark a man of ability. Then the officers were asked to take a little whiskey chez Botts. Talked there with his niece, a dwarfish little woman of middle age, who seems a great invalid. She was all of a tremor, poor woman, by the mere display of troops, being but nervous and associating them with the fighting she had seen round the very house. Then there was a refreshment at Birney's Headquarters, where met Captain Briscoe (said to be the son of an Irish nobleman, etc., etc.); also Major Mitchell on General Hancock's Staff. The Russ was delighted with the politeness and pleased with the troops. Introduced to General Sheridan, the new Chief of Cavalry--a small, broad-shouldered, squat man, with black hair and a square head. He is of Irish parents, but looks very like a Piedmontese. General Wilson, who is probably to have a division, is a slight person of a light complexion and with rather a pinched face. Sheridan makes everywhere a favorable impression. Headquarters Army of
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 4 (search)
do as well as I can. Up rides an officer: Sir! General Getty is hard pressed and nearly out of ammunition! Tell him to hold on and General Gibbon will be up to help him. Another officer: General Mott's division has broken, sir, and is coming back. Tell him to stop them, sir!! roared Hancock in a voice of a trumpet. As he spoke, a crowd of troops came from the woods and fell back into the Brock road. Hancock dashed among them. Halt here! halt here! Form behind this rifle-pit. Major Mitchell, go to Gibbon and tell him to come up on the double-quick! It was a welcome sight to see Carroll's brigade coming along that Brock road, he riding at their head as calm as a May morning. Left face — prime — forward, and the line disappeared in the woods to waken the musketry with double violence. Carroll was brought back wounded. Up came Hays's brigade, disappeared in the woods, and, in a few minutes, General Hays was carried past me, covered with blood, shot through the head. Headq
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
Hancock reposing on his cot. Well, Colonel, says H., now you can't carry it out on my front, it's too hot there. Your best way is to go to the left, where there are only pickets, and the officers there will get it out. So the ever-laborious Major Mitchell was summoned and told to provide some whiskey for the Rebs and a flag. The last was a great point: there seemed nothing white about, except the General's shirt, but at last he found a pillowcase which was ripped up and put on a staff, and yooss of the guns — a mere matter of prestige — but I do mind the fact that the 2d Corps men did not all fight as they should have fought; had they done so, the Rebels (who I suppose were about as three to two) could never have budged them. As Major Mitchell observed: The Rebels licked us, but a dozen more such lickings and there will be nothing left of the Rebel army! My gracious, what a donkey am I to be solemnly sending a telegraph, when I have not been in a single fight. I felt like a donke
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 7 (search)
ich was plenty early enough, as turned out. We rode down to General Hancock's about 9.30. He was camped not far from us, or had been, for now his tents were struck and packed, and there lay the familiar forms of Lieutenant-Colonel Morgan and Major Mitchell, on some boards, trying to make up for their loss of sleep. The cheery Hancock was awake and lively. We here were near the point of the railroad, which excited General Meade's indignation by its exposure. Now they have partly sunk it and pkily had a gray rubber coat on. Hain't got none. What troops are these? Fourth Alabama. Oh, all right, says Dresser, with presence of mind, and rides off, very slow at first, and very fast as soon as out of sight! The best feat was that of Major Mitchell (he always does perform feats). He rode into the woods, saw 200 Rebel infantry who had got lost, and were drawn up in line; came back, got a regiment, went out again and gobbled them all up. . . . [The letter finishes with a lively descrip
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 8 (search)
— weather, law! that isn't very interesting, is it? My head has indeed been singularly empty for letter-writing; when a man talks about weather to his own wife he must be pretty hard up. I heard a characteristic anecdote of Hancock which made me laugh, as I knew his ways. It appears that he had issued stringent orders against plundering, despite which the troops had fallen on a large flock of sheep and were making short work of them. Away went Hancock, followed by the inevitable Morgan, Mitchell, and Parker. Very soon all these three were sent spinning off at tangents, after distant delinquents, and the General went frothing along alone. Presently he catches sight of four men pursuing a poor sheep, bayonet in hand, and off he goes, full tilt, to arrest them; but, before he can get in, poor ba-ba is down and still. You blank blank all-sorts-of-bad-things, roars Hancock, how dare you? How dare you kill that sheep? Please, General, we didn't kill it, cried the terrified soldiers.
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
on Lee's surrender, 358; meets Lee, 360; letter to Lyman, 362. Meigs, Montgomery Cunningham, 248. Meherrin Bridge, 295. Mercier, —, chef, 265, 276. Merritt, Wesley, 68, 346. Mexicans at Headquarters, 23. Miles, Jeremiah, 206. Miles, Nelson Appleton, 150, 292, 322, 331, 337, 338. Milford, 119. Miller, Theodore, 324. Miller, William DeWitt, 225. Mills, Charles James, 233, 332, 338. Milroy's weary boys, 98. Mine Run, 55, 68. Mitchell, John Fulton Berrien, 48. Mitchell, William Galbraith, 82, 92, 134, 150, 226, 233, 253, 288. Moncure house, 122. Monocacy Bridge, 185. Montbarthe, Vicomte de, 254. Morale, in army, 115, 179. Morgan, Charles Hale, 233, 288. Morris, William Hopkins, 67. Morris, —, 312. Morton, James St. Clair, 167. Morton, Samuel George, 167. Morton's Ford, 68, 69. Mott, Gershom, 92, 93, 95, 108, 109, 217, 337. Mott's division, misconduct, 92, 93, 95, 109, 110n, 114, 208, 252, 294. Mt. Carmel Church, 122. Namozine road, 342, 346.