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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 8 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 8 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 8 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 6 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 4 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Moliere or search for Moliere in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
us shot. So, the year before, Cincinnati, tumbling Birney's press into the Ohio, was truly a Southern city; Ante, p. 77. so, the year after, Philadelphia, burning Pennsylvania Hall to the ground. In fact, the least Southern and most surprising of all the mobs of that epoch was precisely the Boston mob against the editor of the Liberator. The foregoing summary is substantially reproduced, without quotation marks, from the New York nation (32.264); but the present writer can plead, with Moliere, Je reprends mon bien ou je le trouve. Of this mob every citizen of Boston and its vicinity must have been reminded when the news came—not as now by telegraph It reached Boston on the forenoon of Sunday, Nov. 19, 1837 (Lib. 7.191).—of Lovejoy's fate. Only a few days before, and in partial reference to the previous destruction of the Observer's presses, Alexander H. Everett, The elder and abler brother of Gov. Edward Everett, already distinguished in the diplomatic service of the