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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for D. A. Monroe or search for D. A. Monroe in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
on our history. I need hardly mention such great names as Senators Mason, Toombs, Jefferson Davis, Benjamin, Stephen A. Douglas, Seward, Sumner, Chase, Trumbull, Bayard, Slidell and Crittenden. Yet I can truthfully assert that of this list of very able men, not one was superior in general, all-'round ability to Mr. Hunter; not one was his equal in legislative force and influence; not one was so universally confided in and trusted. Since the passing away of Jefferson, Madison, Marshall and Monroe, hardly any Virginian has borne so influential a part in political affairs as R. M. T. Hunter, and certainly no Virginian has done so in the Federal Congress, though the Commonwealth has had many sons who were wise and eloquent in council. To be preeminent, or even prominent, in such a galaxy as hers, demanded the very highest qualities of mind and character. When the great and regrettable contest between the North and the South arose, Mr. Hunter held that the South was simply standing
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
, first lieutenant; W. A. Stephenson, second lieutenant; Abner Harrington, junior second lieutenant. Company H—W. L. Thornburg, captain; J. N. Kearns, first lieutenant; Marley Cranford, second lieutenant; Alexander Murdock, junior second lieutenant. Company I—0. P. Gardiner, captain; B. F. Hunt, first lieutenant; O. P. Beane, second lieutenant; W. C. Webb, junior second lieutenant. Company K—M. M. McLaughlin, captain; Angus Shaw, first lieutenant; A. M. Smith, second lieutenant; D. A. Monroe, junior second lieutenant. Miles M. Cowles, adjutant; W. R. Edwards, quartermaster (June 17, 1862); B. H. Sumner, commissary; J. L. Andrews, ordnance sergeant. During the war, in addition to those mentioned, the regiment had the following field officers: Colonel—John Ashford. Lieutenant—Colonel—John Ashford, George W. Flowers. Major—John Ashford, M. McR. McLaughlin, George W. Flowers, J. T. Wilson. Adjutant—David M. McIntyre. Ensign—Wesley F. Matheson. Sergean
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
She was a woman of great variety of information and sweetest culture. Her strength of mind was remarkable, and this wonderful faculty she retained unimpaired up to the ripe age of eighty, when she died. That was seventeen years ago. She was largely instrumental in the formation of the character of her children, and to her careful training and watchful care they owe much of their success in life. My mother was on terms of personal intimacy with every President of the United States, from Monroe to Lincoln, and she had associated with all the distinguished men and women in Washington for the greater part of half a century. This naturally threw her children into the most pleasant surroundings and companionship. I personally remember and knew every President of the United States from the time of Martin Van Buren. And here Mr. Semmes smiled pleasantly as he recalled the first time that he had ever seen Mr. Van Buren. It was at a children's party given in Washington at the resid