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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for W. F. Monroe or search for W. F. Monroe in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 20: a brave officer's mortification.--history set right. (search)
l; Second-Assistant Engineers, E. B. Latch, W. W. Hopper and F. A. Wilson; Third-Assistant Engineers Isaac De Graff, C. M. Burchard, A. K. Fulton, H. H. Pilkington and W. H. Gamble; Acting-Master's Mates, H. H. Judson, C. H. Loundsberry, T. Mason and J. M. Smalley; Boatswain, James Walker; Gunner, John Duncan; Carpenter, J. H. Conley; Sailmaker, J. A. Holbrook. Steamer Harriet Lane. Commander, J. M. Wainwright; Lieutenant, Edward Lea; Acting-Masters, J. A. Hannum, C. H. Hamilton and W. F. Monroe; Assistant Surgeon, T. N. Penrose; Assistant Paymaster, J. J. Richardson; Second-Assistant Engineers, W. H. Plunkett and C. H. Stone; Third-Assistant Engineers, J. E. Cooper, R. N. Ellis and A. T. E. Mullen; Acting-Masters' Mate, C. M. Davis. Steamer Iroquois. Commander, John De Camp; Lieutenants, D. B. Harmony and Fred. V. McNair, Acting-Ensign, C. F. Willard Midshipman, John McFarland; Surgeon, Benj. Vreeland; Paymaster, R. H. Clark; First-Assistant Engineers, John H. Long and B.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 21: capture of New Orleans.--first attack on Vicksburg by Farragut's fleet and mortar flotilla.--junction of flag-officers Farragut and Davis above Vicksburg.--ram Arkansas. (search)
grape and canister, and as Bailey and Perkins were shut in by the crowd, the men stood to their guns ready for the first sign from the tops, that harm had come to the officers, to open the battery on the mob. However, no harm came to those two brave men. It would seem that, in an American mob, there is always some little spark of chivalry, especially where men show pluck. So it was in this case; the two officers reached the mayor's house, and were shown into the presence of the mayor, Mr. Monroe, a cool, brave gentleman, to be sure, but one ruled by the rabble, which has always had undue influence in New Orleans. We have come. said Captain Bailey to the mayor, to demand the surrender of New Orleans, and that the State flag be hauled down from the public buildings, and that only the United States flag be hoisted there. You have the power in your own hands, replied the mayor, and can do as you please, but I doubt if there is a man in New Orleans who would haul down that flag