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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
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ways seeking to institute comparisons, and comparisons to the advantage of their own country, is with so many Americans a tic, a mania, which every one notices in them, and which sometimes drives their friends half to despair. Recent greatness is always apt to be sensitive and self-assertive; let us remember Dr. Hermann Grimm on Goethe. German literature, as a power, does not begin before Lessing; if Germany had possessed a great literature for six centuries, with names in it like Dante, Montaigne, Shakespeare, probably Dr. Hermann Grimm would not have thought it necessary to call Goethe the greatest poet that has ever lived. But the Americans in the rage for comparison-making beat the world. Whatever excellence is mentioned, America must, if possible, be brought in to balance or surpass it. That fine and delicate naturalist, Mr. Burroughs, mentions trout, and instantly he adds: British trout, by the way, are not so beautiful as our own; they are less brilliantly marked and have m
ing suspended by tackle within easy reach, is filled with meat and is then raised to its place in the house. A damper on top of the chimney regulates the draft. Portable smoke-house. Fig. 5231 is a sheetiron portable smokehouse. It has a drawer for fire, a mica panel for observation, register air-holes, and a door above by which the meat is introduced to be suspended from the hooks within. Smoke-jack. The smokejack is supposed to have been invented in the fifteenth century. Montaigne describes one he met with in Switzerland in 1580. It is noticed in a book on Cookery, by Scippi, cook to Pius V. in 1570. My own jacke do carry it [a chine of beef] well. — Pepys' Diary, 1663. Smoke-jack. It was superseded by other roasting-jacks driven by animal or mechanical power, and all the jacks have, unfortunately for the meat and the consumers, been superseded by the oven, which bakes but roasts not. The spit, so common in English kitchens in the last century, was freq
chronicles. They are mentioned in Florio's Worlde of Wordes, 1598 ( ombrella, a fan, a canopie; also a testern or cloth of state for a prince; also a kind of round fan or shadowing that they vse to ride with in summer in Italy; a little shade ), and by Ben Jonson, in a comedy, 1616, and were used by ladies in the time of Queen Anne. Du Cange mentions the custom of contracting and expanding them. Cotgrave, in his History of the English and French tongues, speaks of the French ombrelle. Montaigne refers to its use in Italy. M. de la Loubere, ambassador from France to Siam, 1687-88, states that the King of Siam had a triple umbrella, several frames and covers being fastened to the same stick. This was a royal right. The nobles had single umbrellas. Common people stood in the sun. The Siamese monks (Talapoins) had palm-leaves rut and folded, so that the stem formed a handle. Tavernier describes the umbrellas on each side of the throne of the Great Mogul, and those at the c
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 12: books published. (search)
40, after the death of Gunderode. They were apparently written in the years 1805-06, when Bettina was about sixteen; and she in her letters to Goethe's mother, published in Correspondence of a child, gives an account of this friend and her tragic death. Bettina is now little read, even by young people, apparently, but she then gave food for the most thoughtful. Emerson says: Once I took such delight in Plato that I thought I never should need any other book; then in Swedenborg, then in Montaigne,--even in Bettina; and Mr. Alcott records in his diary (August 2, 1839), he [Emerson] seems to be as much taken with Bettina as I am. For the young, especially, she had a charm which lasts through life, insomuch that the present writer spent two happy days on the Rhine, so lately as 1878, in following out the traces of two impetuous and dreamy young women whom it would have seemed natural to meet on any hillside path, although more than half a century had passed since they embalmed their
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and explorers, 1583-1763 (search)
to accompany him, Dr. Hamilton was well prepared to pass judgment upon the casual acquaintances who crossed his path. When he first looked about him in Philadelphia, he observed several comical, grotesque Phizzes in the inn where I put up, which would have afforded variety of hints for a painter of Hogarth's turn. They talked there upon all subjects,--politicks, religion, and trade,--some tolerably well, but most of them ignorantly. The next morning the Doctor kept his room, reading Montaigne's Essays, a strange medley of subjects, and particularly entertaining. On Sunday he was asked out to dinner, but found our table chat was so trivial and trifling that I mention it not. After dinner I read the second volume of The adventures of Joseph Andrews, and thought my time well spent. Dr. Hamilton, one of the most entertaining of American travellers, appears to advantage even beside the urbanity of Byrd and the sprightliness of Mrs. Knight. Bent upon no special errand, he observ
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: Franklin (search)
nd predestined vesture of his essential blandness and suavity of temper. His stylistic drapery, however, is never so smoothed and adjusted as to obscure the sinewy vigour of his thought. His manner is steadily in the service of his matter. He is adequate, not copious; for his moral frugality and industry prompt him to eschew surplusage and to make his texture firm. His regard for purity of diction is classical; he avoids vulgarity; he despises the jargon of scientific pedants; but like Montaigne he loves frank and masculine speech, and he likes to enrich the language of the well bred by discreet drafts upon the burry, homely, sententious, proverbial language of the people. Like Lord Bacon and like many other grave men among his fellow-countrymen, he found it difficult to avoid an opportunity for a jest even when the occasion was unpropitious; and he never sat below the Attic salt. When his fortune was made, he put by the pewter spoon and bowl of his apprenticeship; his biograph
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and observers, 1763-1846 (search)
with the ideal of an eloquent stoic, artless, magnanimous by nature, we find-often in the same book of travels — the cruel savage as he is, vengeful and impure. Montaigne, indeed, a predecessor of Rousseau in admiring the unlettered aborigines, had held that the European surpassed the savage in barbarity; yet when he turns from the ideal to the actual, there is but a step between Montaigne and Hobbes, who declares the life of nature to be nasty, solitary, brutish, and short. And Hobbes merely anticipates Voltaire and Pauw, whose unedifying pictures of American natives were put together from the accounts of travellers. We have, then, in the literature of because it contains, in distinct types, both the idealized and the unidealized Indian that we have seen in the travellers. Chingachgook is a true descendant of Montaigne's high-minded savage, and belongs to the family of Rousseau's natural man; whereas the base Mingoes are more like real aborigines. The prairie, with its large e
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
0 Errata, 309 Espion turc, la, 233 Essay concerning human understanding, 93, 334 Essay on the freedom of will in God and the creature, 70 n. Essay upon projects, 93 Essay upon the Microscope, 161 Essays (Emerson), 352 Essays (Montaigne), 12 Essays Biographical and critical (Tuckerman), 244 Essays on the Constitution, 148 n. Essays to do good, 93 Eulogium on Major-General Joseph Warren, 168 Eutaw, 315, 316 Eutaw springs, 183 Evangeline, 212 Evans, Nathanie, 322, 322 n. Modern Chivalry, 286-287 Modest inquiry into the nature and necessity of paper Currency, 95 Mohammed, 224 Moll Pitcher, 224 n. Moore, Thomas, 236, 243, 248, 255, 279, 281 Monikins, the, 302 Monitor, the, 117, 120 Montaigne, 12, 109, 187, 188, 208 Monterey, 280 Montesquieu, 119 Monthly magazine, the, 291 Monument of Phaon, the, 181 Monumental memorial of a late voyage, etc., A, 9 Morals of Chess, the, 101 More, Henry, 70 n. Morris, Colonel
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 23: writers of familiar verse (search)
e reason why he has been pleasantly companionable to countless readers who found in him a friendly quality which took them captive. His egotism was as patent as Montaigne's, even if it was not so frank in its expression nor so searching in its analysis. The more of himself he revealed, the more he won the hearts of his fellow menby Steele, improved by Addison, clumsily attempted by Johnson, and lightly varied by Goldsmith. Steele is the originator of the form, since the earlier essay of Montaigne and of Bacon makes no use of dialogue; it has only one interlocutor, the essayist himself, recording only his own feelings, his own opinions, and his own judgmenere which are not as valid today as when they were written. It would be doing the Autocrat an ill-service to compare him with his remote and mighty predecessors Montaigne and Bacon. And it may be admitted that there is more or less warrant for the remark of John Burroughs, to the effect that Holmes always reminded him of certain
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: Whitman (search)
Chapter 1: Whitman Walt Whitman once declared his Leaves of Grass to be the most personal of all books ever published. This is no book; Who touches this, touches a man. Thus he fits Hazlitt's description of Montaigne as one who dared to set down as a writer what he thought as a man. This being the claim of the volume, it becomes highly important to determine the character of the author. Evidently Whitman was not, in any conventional sense of the term, that average man whose praises he sang, else even his novel form of expression would hardly have sufficed to keep his poetry so long a time from the masses. He was a man and a writer who could be hated as an impostor or adored as a Messiah but who was in any case a challenge to discussion. Much light is thrown on his character, of course, by the autobiographical parts of his writings; but here it is frequently difficult to determine which incidents belong to his outward and which to his inner, or imaginative, life, so deftly do
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