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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hanover Court House and Gaines's Mill. (search)
he center and left still remained solid and undisturbed. All available means were used by which I could be kept informed so that I could provide, in the best possible manner, for the many rapid changes and wants suddenly springing up. The Prince de Joinville and his two nephews — the Comte de Paris and Due de Chartres — and Colonels Gantt, Radowitz, and Hammerstein, from the commanding general's staff, joined me as volunteer aides. Each of these, with my own staff, Locke, Kirkland, Mason, Monteith, and McQuade, exposed them-selves to danger, not only quickly and cheerfully carrying every message, but often voluntarily throwing themselves where needed, to direct, to lead, to encourage, and to rally. During the greater part of the afternoon, D. H. Hill's troops, in detachments, were more or less aggressive on the right. The silence which followed the repulse, already referred to, lasted but a short time. The renewed attacks raged with great fierceness and fury, with slight intermi
nto several miry branches. The roads between the creeks and ponds, though apparently of sand, and substantial character, proved to be upon a thin crust, which was soon cut through by our long trains into the deep quicksand, requiring miles of corduroy. At several of the swamps, the enemy had attempted to obstruct our march by falling timber. The supplies continued good and the weather excellent. On the ninth, our direction of march was changed to the east, taking the road from Eden to Monteith Post-Office, on the Charleston Railroad. At the large Monteith Swamp, we found that the enemy, besides obstructing the road for nearly a mile by falling trees, had built two small earthworks, and with a single gun and about four hundred infantry was making a show of stopping our march. Jackson's division being in advance, he was ordered to throw out several regiments on each flank, while a brigade in the centre should make a feint, to engage attention and enable the pioneers to clear the
nto several miry branches. The roads between the creeks and ponds, though apparently of sand, and substantial character, proved to be upon a thin crust, which was soon cut through by our long trains into the deep quicksand, requiring miles of corduroy. At several of the swamps, the enemy had attempted to obstruct our march by falling timber. The supplies continued good and the weather excellent. On the ninth, our direction of march was changed to the east, taking the road from Eden to Monteith Post-Office, on the Charleston Railroad. At the large Monteith Swamp, we found that the enemy, besides obstructing the road for nearly a mile by falling trees, had built two small earthworks, and with a single gun and about four hundred infantry was making a show of stopping our march. Jackson's division being in advance, he was ordered to throw out several regiments on each flank, while a brigade in the centre should make a feint, to engage attention and enable the pioneers to clear the
had fortifications with two pieces of artillery, and their front and right was protected by a swamp. The Thirty-first Wisconsin and Sixty-first Ohio were thrown forward, and succeeded in passing through this swamp, and attacked the enemy in the rear and right. The Eighty-second Ohio was thrown forward as a support, but before my regiment succeeded in passing through this swamp, the Thirty-first Wisconsin and Sixty-first Ohio had attacked and routed the enemy. On the tenth, having reached Monteith, a station on the Savannah and Charleston Railroad, the Third brigade was ordered to commence and effectually destroy as much of this road as possible. The Eighty-second Ohio regiment destroyed about three hundred yards of the road, and also the station-house. The same day, having reached the enemy's lines in front of Savannah, the brigade took up a position with three regiments in line of battle, with the Second brigade on the right. My regiment was on the front line, connecting with th
it, Michigan. The Detroit Gazette, of Nov. 7, 1817, has the following notice of the removal:-- Funeral of Lieutenant John Brooks.--On Friday last, the remains of Lieutenant John Brooks, who fell in the battle on Lake Erie, were interred in the new burial-ground, upon the glacis of Fort Shelby, within the Military Reserve of this city. The ceremony was attended with military honors suited to the rank of the deceased. The body was escorted by a military corps, and preceded by the Rev. Messrs. Monteith and Larned. The pall was supported by six Lieutenants, with scarfs. Lieutenant-Colonel Smith, and the officers of the Fifth United States Regiment, followed as mourners, flanked by marshals. Then succeeded Major-General Macomb, Governor Cass, and the civil, judicial, and municipal officers of the territory and city, citizens and strangers, and the non-commissioned officers and soldiers of the army. The funeral service was performed by the Rev. Mr. Larned. The procession was so
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
ytton Bulwer, 1816-73. He was raised to the peerage as Baron Lytton in 1866. or Disraeli, Benjamin Disraeli, author and statesman, born in 1805, and twice Prime-Minister of England. and we did not exchange words. An evening or two afterwards I sat opposite Bulwer at dinner. It was at my friend Milnes's, where we had a small but very pleasant company,—Bulwer, Macaulay, Hare Francis George Hare, 1786-1842; eldest brother of Augustus and Julius Hare. (called Italian Hare), O'Brien, and Monteith. I sat next to Macaulay, and opposite Bulwer; and I must confess that it was a relief from the incessant ringing of Macaulay's voice to hear Bulwer's lisping, slender, and effeminate tones. I liked Bulwer better than I wished. He talked with sense and correctness, though without brilliancy or force. His wife is on the point of publishing a novel, called Cheveley; or, The Man of Honor, in which are made revelations with regard to her quarrels with her husband. She goes to the theatre, w
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, March 1, 1839. (search)
ytton Bulwer, 1816-73. He was raised to the peerage as Baron Lytton in 1866. or Disraeli, Benjamin Disraeli, author and statesman, born in 1805, and twice Prime-Minister of England. and we did not exchange words. An evening or two afterwards I sat opposite Bulwer at dinner. It was at my friend Milnes's, where we had a small but very pleasant company,—Bulwer, Macaulay, Hare Francis George Hare, 1786-1842; eldest brother of Augustus and Julius Hare. (called Italian Hare), O'Brien, and Monteith. I sat next to Macaulay, and opposite Bulwer; and I must confess that it was a relief from the incessant ringing of Macaulay's voice to hear Bulwer's lisping, slender, and effeminate tones. I liked Bulwer better than I wished. He talked with sense and correctness, though without brilliancy or force. His wife is on the point of publishing a novel, called Cheveley; or, The Man of Honor, in which are made revelations with regard to her quarrels with her husband. She goes to the theatre, w
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 9: (search)
r of Mrs. Alison and son of the famous Professor Gregory. Miss Alison, daughter of the old Dr. Alison,—a very uncommon and striking person, who devotes herself wholly to her father,—came in after dinner. We all stayed late, even for Edinburgh; and Sir William Hamilton came home with us, and bade us farewell in the kindest manner, on our doorsteps. After an excursion as far north as the season allowed, and a visit of one night at Carstairs, on the Clyde, the handsome establishment of Mr. Monteith, the party arrived on the 5th of May at Dumfries, and went the next day to Terregles, the old seat of the Maxwells and Earls of Nithsdale. Here they were expected by Mr. and Mrs. Marmaduke Maxwell, old acquaintances of the party at Wighill Park in 1835. It is one of those ample estates with a large, hospitable, luxurious house upon it, such as abound through the whole island. Its present possessor is Marmaduke Constable Maxwell, and the estate has belonged for four centuries and mor
Marshal,District of Eastern Arkansas.Helena, July 24. Captain: You will please show to the young girl who accompanies the order to your headquarters the contrabands that were turned over to you by the officer of the gunboat last evening. You will allow her to fetch nine (9) back to this office of the number that were turned over to you, and which will be recognized as her mother's negroes by her. By order of Brigadier-General Ross. M. G. Townsend, Capt. and Provost-Marshal. --Monteith, Lieutenant. Immediately on receiving the above the superintendent directed the writer who represents him to proceed to the office of the Provost Marshal and ask Mr. Townsend for a copy of General Ross's order. His reply was that General Ross had been at his office and made the order verbal; it was no written order from the General. The writer stated to Mr. Townsend that Mr. Sawyer wanted the order, as he would give free papers to the colored persons in question. Mr. Townsend r
The Daily Dispatch: August 18, 1864., [Electronic resource], Four thousand five hundred dollars reward. (search)
ial witness; but the witness failing to appear yesterday, he was willing to rest the fate of his client upon the testimony for the Commonwealth, which had already been elicited; whereupon the matter was immediately disposed of as above stated. The charge of stealing a lot of jewelry and money from Mrs. Lucy A. Miller, preferred against Thomas, slave of Talbott & Brother, partially heard on Tuesday by his Honor, and deferred till yesterday, was again continued. Michael Sullivan and Monteith, two white boys of very bad character, were committed for want of security for good behavior — the first charged with striking Belia MacCarthy with a stone, and the second for stealing watermelons in the Second Market. Alice Hardgrove, charged with assaulting John L. Roane with a two-pound weight, and Philip Stanb, charged with receiving a refrigerator from Alice, knowing it to have been stolen from Roane, were discharged. Fanny, slave of Dr. Trent, was whipped for interferi