Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Monteith or search for Monteith in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

nto several miry branches. The roads between the creeks and ponds, though apparently of sand, and substantial character, proved to be upon a thin crust, which was soon cut through by our long trains into the deep quicksand, requiring miles of corduroy. At several of the swamps, the enemy had attempted to obstruct our march by falling timber. The supplies continued good and the weather excellent. On the ninth, our direction of march was changed to the east, taking the road from Eden to Monteith Post-Office, on the Charleston Railroad. At the large Monteith Swamp, we found that the enemy, besides obstructing the road for nearly a mile by falling trees, had built two small earthworks, and with a single gun and about four hundred infantry was making a show of stopping our march. Jackson's division being in advance, he was ordered to throw out several regiments on each flank, while a brigade in the centre should make a feint, to engage attention and enable the pioneers to clear the
nto several miry branches. The roads between the creeks and ponds, though apparently of sand, and substantial character, proved to be upon a thin crust, which was soon cut through by our long trains into the deep quicksand, requiring miles of corduroy. At several of the swamps, the enemy had attempted to obstruct our march by falling timber. The supplies continued good and the weather excellent. On the ninth, our direction of march was changed to the east, taking the road from Eden to Monteith Post-Office, on the Charleston Railroad. At the large Monteith Swamp, we found that the enemy, besides obstructing the road for nearly a mile by falling trees, had built two small earthworks, and with a single gun and about four hundred infantry was making a show of stopping our march. Jackson's division being in advance, he was ordered to throw out several regiments on each flank, while a brigade in the centre should make a feint, to engage attention and enable the pioneers to clear the
had fortifications with two pieces of artillery, and their front and right was protected by a swamp. The Thirty-first Wisconsin and Sixty-first Ohio were thrown forward, and succeeded in passing through this swamp, and attacked the enemy in the rear and right. The Eighty-second Ohio was thrown forward as a support, but before my regiment succeeded in passing through this swamp, the Thirty-first Wisconsin and Sixty-first Ohio had attacked and routed the enemy. On the tenth, having reached Monteith, a station on the Savannah and Charleston Railroad, the Third brigade was ordered to commence and effectually destroy as much of this road as possible. The Eighty-second Ohio regiment destroyed about three hundred yards of the road, and also the station-house. The same day, having reached the enemy's lines in front of Savannah, the brigade took up a position with three regiments in line of battle, with the Second brigade on the right. My regiment was on the front line, connecting with th