Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Monteith or search for Monteith in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
ytton Bulwer, 1816-73. He was raised to the peerage as Baron Lytton in 1866. or Disraeli, Benjamin Disraeli, author and statesman, born in 1805, and twice Prime-Minister of England. and we did not exchange words. An evening or two afterwards I sat opposite Bulwer at dinner. It was at my friend Milnes's, where we had a small but very pleasant company,—Bulwer, Macaulay, Hare Francis George Hare, 1786-1842; eldest brother of Augustus and Julius Hare. (called Italian Hare), O'Brien, and Monteith. I sat next to Macaulay, and opposite Bulwer; and I must confess that it was a relief from the incessant ringing of Macaulay's voice to hear Bulwer's lisping, slender, and effeminate tones. I liked Bulwer better than I wished. He talked with sense and correctness, though without brilliancy or force. His wife is on the point of publishing a novel, called Cheveley; or, The Man of Honor, in which are made revelations with regard to her quarrels with her husband. She goes to the theatre, w
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, March 1, 1839. (search)
ytton Bulwer, 1816-73. He was raised to the peerage as Baron Lytton in 1866. or Disraeli, Benjamin Disraeli, author and statesman, born in 1805, and twice Prime-Minister of England. and we did not exchange words. An evening or two afterwards I sat opposite Bulwer at dinner. It was at my friend Milnes's, where we had a small but very pleasant company,—Bulwer, Macaulay, Hare Francis George Hare, 1786-1842; eldest brother of Augustus and Julius Hare. (called Italian Hare), O'Brien, and Monteith. I sat next to Macaulay, and opposite Bulwer; and I must confess that it was a relief from the incessant ringing of Macaulay's voice to hear Bulwer's lisping, slender, and effeminate tones. I liked Bulwer better than I wished. He talked with sense and correctness, though without brilliancy or force. His wife is on the point of publishing a novel, called Cheveley; or, The Man of Honor, in which are made revelations with regard to her quarrels with her husband. She goes to the theatre, w