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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
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the Davis families, and also of other people in The bend; and, in one instance, credited one of us with $2,000 on his account. The bills were presented by him with promptitude and paid, as were those of others on an independent footing, without delay. He many times borrowed from his master, but was equally as exact in his dealings with his creditors. His sons, Thornton and Isaiah, first learned to work, and then were carefully taught by their father to read, write, and cipher, and now Ben Montgomery's sons are both responsible men of property; one is in business in Vicksburg, and the other is a thriving farmer in the West. A letter from Isaiah is given in another part of this memoir. After the war the Montgomery family purchased our two plantations, The Hurricane and The Brierfield, and the preference was given to them over a Northern man, well endorsed, who offered $300,000 for the property. When on one occasion the negroes could not pay their note when it fell due-the amo
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 85: the end of a noble life, and a nation's sorrow over its loss. (search)
ause to mingle our tears over his death, who was always so kind and thoughtful of our peace and happiness. We extend to you our humble sympathy. Respectfully, your old tenants and servants, Ned Gator, Grant McKinney, Mary Archer, William Nervis, Teddy Everson, Laura Nick, Tom McKinney, Mary Pendleton, Elija Martin, Isabel Kitchens, Henry Garland, William Green, Gus Williams, and others. Thornton Montgomery, now a man of means, the successful son of Joseph E. Davis's old servant, Ben Montgomery, sent the following affectionate note of sympathy: Christine, North Dakota, December 7, 1889 Miss Varina: I have watched with deep interest and solicitude the illness of Mr. Davis at Brierfield, his trip down on the steamer Leathers, and your meeting and returning with him to the residence of Mr. Payne, in New Orleans; and I had hoped that with good nursing and superior medical skill, together with his great will-power to sustain him, he would recover. But, alas! for human endeavor