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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 3 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Extracts from the diary of Lieutenant-Colonel John G. Pressley, of the Twenty-Fifth South Carolina Volunteers. (search)
t, Samuel J. Burger. Second Lieutenant, R. M. Taft. Wee Nee Volunteers (co. C). Captain, Thomas J. China. First Lieutenant, Calhoun Logan. Second Lieut., Henry Montgomery, Jr. Second Lieut., B. P. Brockinton. Marion Light infantry (co. D). Captain, W. J. McKerrall. First Lieutenant, Jas. G. Haselden. Second Liescertained. My estimate was from thirty to fifty. Fourteen prisoners, all colored, were captured, some of them by the Twenty-fifth, and some by the Georgians. Montgomery, of Kansas notoriety, was said to have been in command of the enemy. The loss of the Twenty-fifth South Carolina Volunteers in this engagement was two killed that we had passed that road and cut the enemy off from that means of succor he would have continued the advance. The haste with which the enemy left the island, showed, conclusively, that their force was not deemed sufficient to hold their position. General Montgomery probably expected the attack to be renewed on the next day.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), President Davis in reply to General Sherman. (search)
lace where a box was seized by his pillagers would not have been material if made by a truthful man, but when an habitual falsifier falls into even a slight error of locality, it is not surprising that he should be suspected of having intentionally fixed upon my brother's residence to give point and probability to some other falsehood. The box of papers was found at a farmer's house several miles away from my brother's, and the box did not contain a single letter written to me or by me at Montgomery. Therefore Sherman's statement that he abstracted from that box three letters which had been written to me by loyal officers of the United States army, and returned to the writers to protect them from the suspicion of complicity with the Government at Montgomery, can have no other foundation in truth than, probably, the discovery of letters written at former times and received by me before the inauguration of the Confederate Government at Montgomery. It is due to the memory of the late
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A visit to BeauvoirPresident Davis and family at home. (search)
A visit to Beauvoir—President Davis and family at home. by J. Wm. Jones. Richmond, Va., August 1st, 1886. A trip from Richmond to Beauvoir, by the Richmond and Danville route to Atlanta, the Atlanta, West Point and Montgomery to Montgomery, and thence by the Louisville and Nashville railway, is quick and comparatively comfortable, even at this season. Leaving here at 2 A. M. on Thursday we reached Beauvoir—a flag station on the Louisville and Nashville, half-way between Mobile and Montgomery, and thence by the Louisville and Nashville railway, is quick and comparatively comfortable, even at this season. Leaving here at 2 A. M. on Thursday we reached Beauvoir—a flag station on the Louisville and Nashville, half-way between Mobile and New Orleans—at 4:40 P. M. Friday. The first questions asked are, Where is Mr. Davis's house? Is Mr. Davis at home? The grounds are pointed out as running down to the station, the large vineyard of Scuppernong grapes forming a pleasing contrast to the sighing pines around, and soon the large yard, shaded by live-oaks, is seen, and the dim outlines of the cottages and mansion, as we hurry along the road to the house of a relative on the beach, several hundred yards below. But I was greatly
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson's scabbard speech. (search)
rs of the Institute. The latter, whatever their political opinions, were prudent in language and conservative in bearing. As good soldiers of the State, they were ready and willing to follow her fortunes, however she might command. But while there was no turbulence of spirit or relaxation of discipline, there was with the cadets an increasing interest in public affairs, an eager watching of the moves then being made on the political chessboards at Richmond and Washington, Charleston and Montgomery, and a decreasing interest in all academic studies, save those which pertained to military science. Several cadets, whose States had seceded, resigned their cadetships and hurried home to offer their services to the new confederacy. All were restless, and the most of them anxious for the opportunities of war. In the town, the Secession sentiment was slowly gaining ground, not so much from desire for the dissolution of the Union as from a feeling that Secession was becoming a dire nece
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Wee Nee volunteers of Williamsburg District, South Carolina, in the First (Hagood's) regiment. (search)
g was the result of the election: Captain, John G. Pressley; First Lieutenant, Thomas J. China; Second Lieutenant, Calhoun Logan; Junior Second Lieutenant, Henry Montgomery, Jr. Both Hagood's regiment and Gregg's were known as the First South Carolina volunteers. Colonel Gregg's was called the First because organized first in rnt to love. The necessary papers were signed, an election was held, John G. Pressley was declared elected captain, and Thomas J. China, Calhoun Logan, and Henry Montgomery, Jr., lieutenants. The Wee Nee Volunteers were now in the service of the Confederate States for the war, unconditionally. The next morning I returned to the c did their duty fearlessly, but their tenderness to the poor fellow and their bravery was useless. He died in a few minutes after he was brought in. Lieutenant Henry Montgomery, Jr., of Company C, was killed about ten or eleven o'clock in the morning. A piece of shell took off the greater portion of his head. A Christian gentle
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roll of the Rockbridge Battery of artillery, April 10, 1865. (search)
resent. Lewis, James P. Present. Link, David. Sick at home. Absent. McCampbell, W. Present. McClintic, W. Present. McCorkle, T. E. Present. McCorkle, T. M. Absent. McCorkle, W. Present. McCrum, Barton. Present. McGruder, D. N. Present. McGruder, Horatio. Present. Marshall, John. Present. Martin,——. Captured at Gettysburg. Absent. Matter, Samuel. Present. Meade, Frank A. Present. Minor, Launcelot. Wounded at Cumberland Church. Absent. Montgomery, B. Present. Moore, Ed. Present. Moore, John H. Present. Moore, L. Absent. Mooterspaw, W. Present. Morgan,——. At home sick. Absent. Myers, John. Present. Page, Powell. Present. Paine, James. At home sick. Absent. Paine, M. Absent. Paxton,——. Wounded. Absent. Phillips,——. Wounded. Absent. Pollard,——. Present. Pugh, George. Present. Pugh, John. Present. Private Rader,——. On Furlough. Absent. Rawlings, J. M. On furlough