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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 2 Browse Search
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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 9.-the battle of West-point, Va. Fought May 7, 1862. (search)
ng body of villains I ever beheld, and as for honor and mercy, they know not the first principles of such excellent virtues. They are lost to all sense of honor, and should be used as dogs. Our men were brought in rapidly — many fine officers killed — and several men killed with Minie-balls and their throats cut from ear to ear! Savages themselves would blush at such barbarity. Gen. Newton conducted the engagement, Gen. Franklin arriving at twelve M. on the field. It was a beautifully planned battle, and they expected to drive us into the river. We had twenty thousand men against us, composed of Tennesseeans, Texan volunteers, Louisiana Tigers, Virginians, and Alabamians, beside the Hampton Legion. Our men fought like tigers, although they suffered severely. We are expecting to meet them again to-day, and will give them another chance at us. We are surrounded by them here, but we are bound to be in Richmond soon. Believe me, ever, your affectionate son, James E. Montgomery
eered, and the Van Dorn struck her a glancing blow, making a hole four feet deep in her starboard forward quarter, evidenced by splinters left on the iron bow of the Van Dorn. As our remaining boats, the General M. Jeff. Thompson, the Colonel Lovell and the General Beauregard, were entering boldly into the contest in their prescribed order, I perceived from the flag-boat that the enemy's boats were taking positions where the water was too shallow for our boats to get at them, and as our cannon were far inferior to theirs, both in number and size, I signalled our boats to fall back, which was accomplished with a coolness that deserves the highest commendation. I am happy to inform you, while exposed at close quarters to a most terrific fire for thirty minutes, our boats, although struck repeatedly, sustained no serious injuries. (Signed) J. E. Montgomery, Senior Captain Commanding River Defence Fleet. N. B. Our casualties were two killed and one wounded, (arm broken.)
s edge, as though it had been thrown from the track. At 5.40 A. M., four or five dark, dingy-looking rebel gunboats came round the point or bend. After manoeuvring up and down the levee awhile, as though receiving ammunition and troops, Com. J. Ed. Montgomery's flag-ship Little Rebel appears in sight, and moves from one vessel to another as if communicating, preparatory to the conflict, as we soon afterwards discovered, to the delight of our seamen, gunners and rams. In the mean time, Col. El Davis's order, throughout our fleet. In the mean time, the rebel fleet, comprising the Gen. Van Dorn, (flag-ship,) Gen. Price, Gen. Bragg, Jeff. Thompson, Gen. Lovell, Gen. Beauregard, Sumter, and Little Rebel, all rams, commanded by Commodore J. Ed. Montgomery, move up the river, the Little Rebel leading the van. Our fleet, in the mean time, advances to meet them, the Louisville and Cairo dropping below the Benton, the Cairo head on. The Benton is now signalled for, and takes the lead. The
and Lieutenant-Colonel Lightfoot, of the Sixth Alabama, Captain Reedy, of the Third Alabama, (wounded and missing at Boonesboro Gap;) Colonel Alfred Cumming, of the Tenth Georgia; Major Tracy, badly, and Captain Watson, of the Sixth Georgia; Lieutenant-Colonel Sloan, of the Fifty-third Georgia; Colonel Jones, of the Twenty-second Georgia; Lieutenant-Colonel Crowder, badly, of the Thirty-first Georgia; Major Lewis, Captains Harney and St. Martin, and Lieutenants Murphy, Cook, Current, Dea, Montgomery, Bryant, Wren, Birdsall, and McJimsey, of the Eighth Louisiana; Colonel Penn, Captains Frank Clark and O'Connor, and Lieutenants Smith, Orr and Martin, of the Sixth Louisiana; Captains Herrin, Morgan and Harper, and Lieutenants Knox, Tarpey, Flower, Talbot, and Wells, of the Seventh Louisiana; Major Menger, Captain Hart and Lieut. Patterson, of the Fifth Louisiana; Colonel Hately, Lieutenant-Colonel T. B. Lamar, Sergeant-Major Anderson, of the Fifth Florida; Captain Gregory, and privates H
and Lieutenant-Colonel Lightfoot, of the Sixth Alabama, Captain Reedy, of the Third Alabama, (wounded and missing at Boonesboro Gap;) Colonel Alfred Cumming, of the Tenth Georgia; Major Tracy, badly, and Captain Watson, of the Sixth Georgia; Lieutenant-Colonel Sloan, of the Fifty-third Georgia; Colonel Jones, of the Twenty-second Georgia; Lieutenant-Colonel Crowder, badly, of the Thirty-first Georgia; Major Lewis, Captains Harney and St. Martin, and Lieutenants Murphy, Cook, Current, Dea, Montgomery, Bryant, Wren, Birdsall, and McJimsey, of the Eighth Louisiana; Colonel Penn, Captains Frank Clark and O'Connor, and Lieutenants Smith, Orr and Martin, of the Sixth Louisiana; Captains Herrin, Morgan and Harper, and Lieutenants Knox, Tarpey, Flower, Talbot, and Wells, of the Seventh Louisiana; Major Menger, Captain Hart and Lieut. Patterson, of the Fifth Louisiana; Colonel Hately, Lieutenant-Colonel T. B. Lamar, Sergeant-Major Anderson, of the Fifth Florida; Captain Gregory, and privates H
a blacksmith's hammer; crash came the shot and grape through the ports. But we were through. As soon as we came in front of Vicksburgh the enemy below showed signs of a stampede. They forthwith burned a mortar-boat, their transports got up steam, and had not our crew been exhausted we could have destroyed the whole bevy. But the thing was not over for the day. At sundown Farragut's fleet commenced passing down, eight going down and exchanging shots with us as they passed. But as we were not at our favorite range, we have no idea what damage we inflicted. Before closing, I must pay my respects to the sturdy rams that were to pounce upon us. The rascals gave us a very wide berth; and I would advise Abraham I. to dispense with Col. Ellet, Medical Cadet Ellet, Lieut. Ellet, etc., etc., (see Phoenix's Survey of Mission Dolores Railroad.) No doubt they whizzed away at Mr. Montgomery's light boats, but when they heard the ring of the true metal from our vessel, they skedaddled.