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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 1 (search)
the next lower. But, as it was certain that the war would be conducted by the Confederate Government, and its officers had precedence of those having like State grades, I preferred the Confederate commission. The President had me called to Montgomery to receive instructions, and there assigned me to the command of Harper's Ferry. In my journeys from Washington to Richmond, from Richmond to Montgomery, and thence to Harper's Ferry, I saw in the crowds assembled at all the railroad-statioMontgomery, and thence to Harper's Ferry, I saw in the crowds assembled at all the railroad-stations the appearance of great enthusiasm for the war against subjugation-so much as to give me the impression that all of the population fit for military service might have been brought into the field, if the Confederate Government could have furnished them with arms and ammunition-which, unfortunately, it had not provided. That government depended for arms, for the war then imminent, mainly upon those found in the arsenals at Fayetteville, Charleston, Augusta, Mount Vernon, and Baton Rouge; Unite
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
aughan's brigade had not been engaged at Baker's Creek; his men were fresh and, I believed, were not demoralized. I knew that the Missouri troops, under their gallant leaders, could be depended upon. By whose order the battery-horses were so far removed from their guns as not to be available, I do not know; it certainly was not by mine. General Bowen, with whom I had a personal interview in his tent on the night of the 16th, and who received his instructions from my own lips (Lieutenant-Colonel Montgomery, of Lieutenant-General E. Kirby Smith's staff, being then present and acting as my aide-de-camp), I do not believe to be responsible for it; he was too old and too good a soldier. Enough, however, will, I think, be developed in a few words to cover the whole case. Early on the morning of the 17th the enemy opened his artillery at long range, and very soon pressed forward with infantry into the copse of wood north of the railroad; about the same time, he opened on Colonel Cockre